[Spellyans] redistribution of <i> and <y>

Craig Weatherhill weatherhill at freenet.co.uk
Thu Jul 24 08:06:09 IST 2008


It is doubtful that the word translates as "kitchen" in toponyms, except 
in the case of Park an Gegen (1696), a field name in Breage. In the 
settlement name Pengegon, Padel suggests an otherwise unattested Cornish 
cognate of W. cegin, "ridge"; and this might also be the case in the 
third name containing the element, another field name Creggan-Geggan 
(Phillack), recorded in 1809.

Pengegon is the only one of the three that offers several historical 
spellings which are as follows:
Pengygen 1327, 1381; Pengigon 1361; Pengegon 1606.

Craig


Daniel Prohaska wrote:
>
> Lhuyd has both <kegen> and <kegin>, N.Boson has <kegen, CW has <kegen> 
> (2013); (radical form shown here). Toponyms show <-gegon> according to 
> Gendall and Craig.
>
> Dan
>
> -----Original Message-----
> *From*: Michael Everson
> *Sent*: Wednesday, July 23, 2008 3:02 PM
>
> At 09:40 +0200 2008-07-23, Daniel Prohaska wrote:
>
> ><i> in the second syllable could be interpreted as meaning /i/ in
>
> >both Late as well as Middle Cornish pronunciations, while the <y>
>
> >spellings would indicate that the pronunciation is /i/ in Middle
>
> >Cornish and /e/ in Late Cornish based varieties.
>
> “I don't see how. Neil Kennedy has:
>
> kitchen(n): kegen/kegin (f) (NB,Lh,WJ,PN) (an gegen) pl kegidnow
>
> To me this looks like <kegyn> pl <kegynnow>~<kegydnow>
>
> -- 
>
> Michael Everson * http://www.evertype.com”
>
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