[Spellyans] <y>, <i>, etc

Koumanonff koumanonff at orange.fr
Fri Jul 25 23:01:05 IST 2008


In Breton we have :

en < ent (< OB int) : adverbial particle that doesn't cause any mutation, as exception (sandhi by hardening) we have : ent + da > enta, eta. "ent" has a variant "ez" that causes soft mutation : ez c'hlas, ez c'houllo, ez vev, ez vihan, ez wir...

en (< OB in) : preposition

I think its really two different words. Mutations, as far as I know, became from phonetic assimilations between words. Often the vowel or the consonant responsible of the mutation disappears because of the stress.

Sure enough yn (E in) and yn (E -ly) have the same origins as in Breton.

Otherwise, I quite agree with Eddie. There's no need to distinguish them in spelling : they haven't the same functions, one causes mutation and the other doesn't, they don't happen in the same contexts.

In Welsh we have three "yn" distinguished by their functions and by the mutations that they may cause :
yn + SM (W) used before nouns and adjectives ; with adjectives it can be used as yn + MM (C) to make adverbs.
yn + NM (optionally) (W): preposition
yn (W) used before verbal nouns, whose function is quite the same as ow + HM (C) and o + MM (B)

I don't think it's more difficult ever to learn Welsh.

In many languages there no need to distinguish homonyms as they occur in different contexts and don't have the same functions.

Stefan


> Message du 25/07/08 22:53
> De : "nicholas williams" 
> A : "Standard Cornish discussion list" 
> Copie à : 
> Objet : Re: [Spellyans] , , etc
> 
> yn 'in' and adverbial yn are different words, because one causes mutation and the other doesn't. 
Your analogies are false.

> 
Nicholas 

> 
On 25 Jul 2008, at 16:56, Jon Mills wrote:


Just because a word has two or more syntactic functions does not entail two or more lexemes. Are going to spell GALLOS (noun) differently from GALLOS (verb), and every other word that has more than one syntactic function in Cornish? Would you spell the English word BITE differently  in 'Bite an apple' from 'Let's go for a bite' because one is a verb and the other a noun?
> 
> I'll be away from my computer over the weekend. Talk to you all again on Monday.
> 
> Ol an gwella
> Jon
> 
> 
> 
----- Original Message -----
> 
From: "Michael Everson" <everson at evertype.com>
> 
To: "Standard Cornish discussion list" <spellyans at kernowek.net>
> 
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] , , etc
> 
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2008 14:25:26 +0100
> 

> 

> 
.... It seems to me that the preposition which does not mutate
> 
has developed into an adverbial particle which mutates. 
> 

> _____________________________________
> Dr. Jon Mills,
> School of European Culture and Languages,
> University of Kent
> 
> 
> -- 
> Be Yourself @ mail.com!
> Choose From 200+ Email Addresses
> Get a Free Account at www.mail.com
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Spellyans mailing list
> Spellyans at kernowek.net
> http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net
> 
> 
>
> [ (pas de nom de fichier) (0.2 Ko) ]
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://kernowek.net/pipermail/spellyans_kernowek.net/attachments/20080726/f1a64888/attachment-0001.html>


More information about the Spellyans mailing list