[Spellyans] honen and onen

Craig Weatherhill craig at agantavas.org
Tue Nov 25 10:27:56 GMT 2008


Ray does have a point, as schwa is fast disappearing from English  
pronunciation thanks to television/radio; a habit that might well  
creep into Cornish as all its present day speakers are first-language  
English speakers.

(typical examples:  the surname Lomas, formerly "LOE-mus", now heard  
on BBC/ITV as "LOE-mass"' and Zennor ("ZEN-ur") as "ZEN-aw").

Craig


On 25 Du 2008, at 08:41, Ray Chubb wrote:

> I note that an earlier spec. for the SWF had 'onan' but 'honen', so  
> how did 'honan' slip in?
>
> My concern in all this is that the very people who we would most  
> like to learn Cornish, (I hope that is the view of us all), will  
> pronounce the 'a' in both cases as a long 'a'.  This concern  
> overrides any argument about etymology or a rule that vowels had to  
> follow KK.
>
>
> On 24 Du 2008, at 20:34, nicholas williams wrote:
>
>> It is not traditional. I suspect it came from my dictionary. But if  
>> Gorseth Kernow is using it, it is in use and honan, although a  
>> traditional spelling is out of alignment with it.
>>
>> Nicholas
>>
>> On 24 Nov 2008, at 19:17, Daniel Prohaska wrote:
>>
>>> Is <honensys> a traditionally attested word? Could the /e/ come  
>>> from secondary i-umlaut of /a/?
>>> Dan
>>
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>
> Ray Chubb
>
> Portreth
> Kernow
>
>
>
>
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--
Craig Weatherhill





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