[Spellyans] Introduction - new member

Christian Semmens christian.semmens at gmail.com
Fri Dec 11 10:24:53 GMT 2009


Hi Herbie,

Just a quick note to say hello and welcome to the list. I hope you find it
useful. :)

Chris

2009/12/10 Herbie Blackburn <kevin.blackburn1 at ntlworld.com>

>  Hello – my name is Kevin Blackburn, nickname Herbie.
>
>
>
> Since about 1982 I have studied all Celtic languages, as an amateur,
> compiling a Comparative Celtic Dictionary of all extant, modern and all
> extinct forms of Celtic languages. It is a passion, and a consuming
> interest, taking up a lot of my time, especially in the winter when the
> weather curtails my other main interest of cycling. My interest in Celtic
> languages covers all modern forms of living Celtic languages, historical
> forms, and related translations from other languages which have a bearing on
> or are influenced by Celtic. My bibliography for this study is pretty big,
> being in excess of 150 major works, with many waiting in my library to be
> added to this tally.
>
>
>
> From a very early point in this growing study I had an affinity for
> Cornish, and quickly acquired materials such as the 1978 edition of R Morton
> Nance’s E-C – C-E dictionary, Cornish for Beginners (Pool – 1979), A Concise
> guide to Cornish (Ken George), Lyver Lavarow Kernewek (Bice 1987) – from the
> Cornish Language Board; and copies of Jenkin’s Cornwall and It’s People,
> Carew’s Survey of Cornwall, and many other incidental Cornish works. This
> lead me into some valuable and interesting correspondences (before the days
> of email and the internet) with the likes of: Wella Brown (1989),  ‘Cowetha’
> (1989), John Robert King / ‘Jowan Byghan’; and later via email: Matthew
> Spriggs, Marion Gunn, Michael Everson, Andrew Climo, Nicholas Williams and
> Ray Chubb – all of whom have been a great help to me in shaping my studies
> and the form of my Comparative Celtic Dictionary, and a great encouragement
> of my interest.
>
>
>
> More recently I have followed with interest, and not a little dismay, the
> debates on the proposed written form of modern Cornish. I was starting to
> think written Cornish would be an ever moving target, which of course all
> living languages are to some degree, but in a far from productive way. Now
> reviewing where Cornish is today, I look on with some excitement, hoping to
> witness a final resolution to the recent flux and being able to study a
> written form of modern Cornish with some greater certainty. Hence my
> interest in this discussion group, and machinations of driving out the form
> of Kernowak.
>
>
>
> I look forward to the discussions and progress that this group represents,
>
>
>
> Regards
>
>
>
> Herbie
>
>
>
> eMail: kevin.blackburn1 at ntlworld.com
>
> P Please consider the environment before printing this eMail - thanks
>
>
>
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>
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