[Spellyans] Tregear's Cornish

Craig Weatherhill craig at agantavas.org
Tue Aug 24 14:21:09 IST 2010


SWF/T has this as 'cantolbren'  (interesting - not cantolbrenn, which  
you might expect - there being a case for 'secondary stress' here).

'Secondary stress' is the card being currently used as an excuse for  
MAGA spelling Penzance as 'Pennsans', which is ridiculous.  There is  
no stress whatsoever on the Pen- of the name.  Locally you can ever  
hear the name as 'zanss'.

Craig


On 24 Est 2010, at 13:45, j.mills at email.com wrote:

> If 'coltrebyn' is the form used in Tregear's time, how should we  
> spell this word in KS?
> Ol an gwella
> Jon
>
> _____________________________________
> Dr. Jon Mills,
> School of European Culture and Languages,
> University of Kent
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: j.mills at email.com
> To: spellyans at kernowek.net
> Sent: Tue, Aug 24, 2010 1:37 pm
> Subject: Re: [Spellyans] Tregear's Cornish
>
> I presume 'coltrebyn' is a reflex of Old Cornish  
> 'cantulbren' [Vocabularium Cornicum: 756].
> Ol an gwella
> Jon
> _____________________________________
> Dr. Jon Mills,
> School of European Culture and Languages,
> University of Kent
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: nicholas williams <njawilliams at gmail.com>
> To: Standard Cornish discussion list <spellyans at kernowek.net>
> Sent: Tue, Aug 24, 2010 12:21 pm
> Subject: Re: [Spellyans] Tregear's Cornish
>
> Some words in TH have been adapted to Cornish phonetic type, like  
> spryngya, lyftya. These can surely be used.
> Interestingly <spryngya, speringya, springya> was confined to  
> Tregear until BK was discovered. Now we have
>
> A Christ, re be benegas!
> Attomma fyntan spryngys BK 785-86.
>
> Decevya 'deceive' is used by both TH and SA, but the first  
> attestation is in Pascon agan Arluth: Pehadoryon rag perna
> o desevijs dre satnas 'to redeem sinners who had been deceived by  
> Satan' PA 5c. Rebukya is used frequently by TH but the first  
> attestation again is in PA: ena y an rebukyas 'then they rebuked  
> him' PA 112a and ef a ve veyll rebukis 'he was vilely rebuked' PA  
> 156a.
> I have not done a thorough word count, but it always seems to me  
> that PA has proportionally more borrowed verbs than any other
> text apart from TH and SA; yet in date of composition PA is the  
> oldest MC text.
> And when it comes to adverbs BK takes the biscuit with ha sekretly  
> bew hedre vy ow ro theso a vyth clere 'and secretly as long as you  
> live my gift to you will be clear' BK 638-40.
>
> Again forsakya 'forsake' looks like one of Tregear's words; oddly  
> enough it is used three times in BM, once by Nicholas Boson in JCH  
> and only twice by TH.
>
> The word attendya 'attend, pay attention to' occurs 14 times:
> PA x 1
> BM x 7
> BK x 3
> CW x 1
> and twice in TH. So this word, though obviously a borrowing, is well  
> established long before TH.
>
> For 'disciple' we all learnt dyskybel, plural dyskyblon. I have been  
> criticised for using the plural dyscyplys, as though the word came  
> from TH.
> It does of course, but the first attestations are zyscyplys PA 52a;  
> PA 55c and dysciplys PC 391.
>
> Moreover TH has some excellent native words not found elsewhere in MC:
>
> coltrebyn 'candlestick'; denlath 'murderers'; an hollsens 'all  
> saints'.
>
> We should perhaps not be too quick to condemn TH's vocabulary out of  
> hand.
>
> Nicholas
>
> On 24 Est 2010, at 11:16, Craig Weatherhill wrote:
>
>> I think we have to take great care which we adopt into Cornish, and  
>> why we do so.
>
> =
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--
Craig Weatherhill





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