[Spellyans] lyw & lew

Hewitt, Stephen s.hewitt at unesco.org
Fri Feb 11 15:15:26 GMT 2011


And that’s exactly the situation in Breton:

 

/liw/ ‘colour’

/bẹw, tẹ̣w/ ‘alive, thick’

/blɛ̣ˑw, lɛ̣ˑw/, etc. ‘hair, league/rudder’

 

Steve Hewitt

 

________________________________

From: spellyans-bounces at kernowek.net [mailto:spellyans-bounces at kernowek.net] On Behalf Of Daniel Prohaska
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 4:09 PM
To: 'Standard Cornish discussion list'
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] lyw & lew

 

Jon a scrifas:

“I took it, therefore, that "lew" in Jordan (1611) was indicative of a sound change between Middle and Late Cornish.”

 

Unlikely, as Lhuyd writes <liu> and <liụ> for ‘colour’, <bêụ> ‘alive’ and <têụ> ‘thick’. That shows that old /iw/ remained distinct while old /ɪw/ and /ew/ coalesced.

Dan  

 

________________________________

From: Dr Jon Mills
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 3:07 PM

 

The word for 'colour' is attested as follows.

Pascon agan Arluth: lyw.

Ordinalia: lyv, lyw.
I took it, therefore, that "lew" in Jordan (1611) was indicative of a sound change between Middle and Late Cornish.

Ol an gwella,

Jon

_____________________________________ 
Dr. Jon Mills, 
University of Kent

 

-----Original Message-----
From: nicholas williams <njawilliams at gmail.com>
To: Standard Cornish discussion list <spellyans at kernowek.net>
Sent: Fri, Feb 11, 2011 1:18 pm
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] lyw & lew

And then there is also the question of Tregear's <lew> 'flood' and <lew> 'colour' in CW. 

The form lew 'colour' means that the minimal pair liu ~ leu may not be so.
....

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