[Spellyans] loan words

Herbie Blackburn kevin.blackburn1 at ntlworld.com
Sat Feb 19 12:47:28 GMT 2011


Eddie wrote:

 

> On 2011 Whe 19, at 09:13, Craig Weatherhill wrote:

>... In France, they campaign against "Franglais"; in Russia, against
"Russlish".  I think Cornish needs to minimise "Cornglish".

> 

>In a similar way, the Chinese government is trying to get rid of
'Chinglish'.

> 

>In Wales, 'Wenglish' seems to be fairly acceptable in informal
.

Certainly I see no point in reviving a Cornish full of ‘Kernglish’ – in the
limit, if unchecked the revived Cornish would just become English, as more
and more loan words are absorbed into it. Again, similar to the use /
non-use of diacritics – there should be an official stand point of little
use of loan words where it can be avoided, acknowledging that colloquially
people will use what works for them.

Regards

Herbie

eMail: kevin.blackburn1 at ntlworld.com

P Please consider the environment before printing this eMail - thanks

 

  _____  

From: spellyans-bounces at kernowek.net [mailto:spellyans-bounces at kernowek.net]
On Behalf Of Eddie Climo
Sent: 19 February 2011 11:14
To: Standard Cornish discussion list
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] loan words

 

On 2011 Whe 19, at 09:13, Craig Weatherhill wrote:

... In France, they campaign against "Franglais"; in Russia, against
"Russlish".  I think Cornish needs to minimise "Cornglish".

 

In a similar way, the Chinese government is trying to get rid of
'Chinglish'.

 

In Wales, 'Wenglish' seems to be fairly acceptable in informal or colloquial
contexts, but not in more literary or formal ones.

 

I would suggest a similar distinction might suit Cornish as well. All right
for casual use in the pub over a few pints with your pals perhaps, but not
really suitable for formal or literary use.

 

Certainly, the unrestrained use of 'Kernglish' makes our language look
ludicrously macaronic. Let me forestall any quibbling over my use of the
latter word with a quote from the handy Americal OED on my Mac:

 

macaronic. denoting language, esp. burlesque verse, containing words or
inflections from one language introduced into the context of another.

 

And just to clarify that the word 'burlesque' is not being used in its more
recent US sense of a strip show, here's a further definition (to forestall
any pedantic quibblers):

 

burlesque. a parody or comically exaggerated imitation of something, esp. in
a literary or dramaticwork

 

To show the 'burlesque' extremes some writers have gone to, I opened
'Clappya Kernowek' to the chapter that offers 'understondyng', which is
fairly typical of what the writer recommends in the way of vocabulary, we
find the following Gerva:

 

'Clappya Kernowek' §23C.1

[Kernglish:]

benefyt, benefyttys, declaracyon, duty, dysobedyens, gras, homyly, homylys,
understondyng, unkyndnes, mytt, compella, onora, redemya

 

[Kernowek:]

dader, spot vyth, dervyn, gordhya

 

It wouldn't be surprising if the writer had replaced the 2nd small group
with:

godnes, deservya,  & worshyppya


leaving only 'spot vyth' (which already contains one loan word). Actually,
forms of the last 2 are in his 2006 UCR dictionary—I only invented 'godnes'!

 

Why on earth would anyone want to learn such a burlesque, parodic, comically
exaggerated, macaronic pidgin as this?

 

As Tregear might have put it, "Abyl dhe understondya appel po benefyt parody
mar radycal a'gan auncyent yeth nyns of spot vyth!"

 


Eddie Foirbeis Climo

- -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- -

Dres ethom akennow byner re bo lyeshes

Accenti non multiplicandi praeter necessitatem

 

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