[Spellyans] loan words

Craig Weatherhill craig at agantavas.org
Wed Feb 23 12:18:27 GMT 2011


Absolutely, Jon.  Examples include the following (which also show loss  
of -dh-).

Bannallack (St Buryan):  Banathelek 1443
Benallack (Grampound):  Benathelek 1244, 1390;  Banathlek 1332
Benallack (St Enoder):  Benathelek 1244, 1284; Banathelek 1302;  
Banazelek 1321; Banadhelek 1327, Banathlek 1334 (yes, that's a -dh- in  
the 1327 ex.)
Benallack (Mabe):  Bonadlek 1327, Benathlek 1343
Bonallack (Constantine):  Banadluc 1250; Bannallec 1302; Benathelek  
1321;  Benadleke 1375;  Banadlek 1387;  Benadlek 1386; Banadlak 1400;  
Benatheleck 1572; Benallacke 1582;  Benallock 1584;
   		          Banathleacke 1652
Carvannel (Gwennap):  Kaervanathel 1302; Carvanal 1390, Carvanell  
1542; Carvannell 1613, 1691



OJP says in CPNE:
"banadhel 'broom-plants', Voc 694 glossing genesta:  the Cornish word  
is plural, for sg. *banathlen; Lh. 240c bannolen 'a broom [sc. bush];  
dialect bannal 'broom' (e.g. Davey, Flora, p.111).  Since in OCo.  
banathel, the -e- is an epethentic vowel (LHEB, pp337f.), it will not  
have counted as a syallable, and the stress in Cornish (as in Welsh  
banal, banal, Breton banal, balan) was on the first syllable; the  
development, with loss of internal -th- before -l, is parallel to the  
Welsh form banal (15th-cent., GPC) and Breton banal (HPB, p. 488:  the  
forms lacking d/z can be traced as early as the 12th century, - 
Benalec, and 13th, -Banalec, in place-names; cf. Tabguy, p. 103; RC 3,  
400)."

Craig



On 23 Whe 2011, at 11:27, Dr Jon Mills wrote:

> Craig,
> is "banadhlek" attested in Cornish toponymy? I don't find this word  
> in the texts.
> Ol an gwella,
> Jon
> _____________________________________
> Dr. Jon Mills,
> University of Kent
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Craig Weatherhill <craig at agantavas.org>
> To: Standard Cornish discussion list <spellyans at kernowek.net>
> Sent: Wed, Feb 23, 2011 11:03 am
> Subject: Re: [Spellyans] loan words
>
> "Banallek" was originally "banadhlek".
>
> Craig
>
> On 23 Whe 2011, at 11:09, ewan wilson wrote:
>
> > Yes, DYWYVER is another simply splendid coinage that goes to prove  
> > that Cornish has an innate facility more than most languages for >  
> producing the neatest of neologisms! I off to attend to my dywyver >  
> right now! I don't think I remember this in any of my Cornish >  
> dictionaries- or certainly have not picked up on it! Thanks for >  
> bringing it to my attention.
> >
> > Ewan.
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: Eddie Climo
> > To: Standard Cornish discussion list
> > Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 6:46 AM
> > Subject: Re: [Spellyans] loan words
> >
> > On 2011 Whe 23, at 00:04, ewan wilson wrote:
> >> ... I think pellgowser is far more euphonic and just asks to be  
> >> used!!
> >
> > Agreed. I also like 'dywyver' for a radio, it being of course a >  
> calque on the obsolescent English 'wireless'. I also like the >  
> distinction many Kernewegoryon make between this pair, an English >  
> loan and a native Brythonic word:
> > torchen - an electric torch
> > faklen - a flaming torch.
> >
> > Oddly enough, these last two were amongst the first words I ever >  
> learnt in Cornish, along with 'banallek', a furze thicket (with >  
> geminate -ll-, mind you!)
> >
> > Eddie Climo
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Spellyans mailing list
> > Spellyans at kernowek.net
> > http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net
> > _______________________________________________
> > Spellyans mailing list
> > Spellyans at kernowek.net
> > http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net
>
> -- 
> Craig Weatherhill
>
> _______________________________________________
> Spellyans mailing list
> Spellyans at kernowek.net
> http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net
> _______________________________________________
> Spellyans mailing list
> Spellyans at kernowek.net
> http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net

--
Craig Weatherhill





More information about the Spellyans mailing list