[Spellyans] Tailed-Z

Jon Mills j.mills at email.com
Wed Apr 25 16:27:22 IST 2012


I've just come across this description of tailed-z on Wikipedia.

"Blackletter Z
 A glyph variant of Z originating in the medieval Gothic minuscules http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_minuscule  and the Early Modern Blackletter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackletter  typefaces is the "tailed z" (German geschwänztes Z, also Z mit Unterschlinge). In some Antiqua http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiqua_(typeface_class)  typefaces, this letter is present as a standalone letter or in ligatures. Together with long s http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_s  (ſ), it is the origin of the ß http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9F  ligature in the German alphabet http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_alphabet .
Z in an Antiqua typeface may be identical with the character representing 3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3_(number)  in other fonts.
 A graphical variant of tailed Z is Ezh http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C6%B7 , as adopted into the International Phonetic Alphabet http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA  as the sign for the voiced postalveolar fricative http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiced_postalveolar_fricative . Tailed Z is to be distinguished from the similar insular G http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insular_G  and yogh http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yogh  found in Old English, Irish, Middle English, etc.
Unicode http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicode  assigns codepoints for "BLACK-LETTER CAPITAL Z" and "FRAKTUR SMALL Z" in the Letterlike Symbols http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letterlike_Symbols  and Mathematical alphanumeric symbols http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_alphanumeric_symbols  ranges, at U+2128 ℨ and U+1D537 𝖟, respectively."

 Ol an gwella,
 Jon
----- Original Message -----
From: Jon Mills
Sent: 04/25/12 03:38 PM
To: Standard Cornish discussion list
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] Dauns and dauncya

Michael,
 Would you use yogh <ȝ> to transcribe the long-tailed-z found in the Breton Catholicon? There is no distinction in the pen strokes between that and yogh.
 Jon
----- Original Message -----
From: Michael Everson
Sent: 04/25/12 03:08 PM
To: Standard Cornish discussion list
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] Dauns and dauncya

 On 25 Apr 2012, at 14:54, Jon Mills wrote: > Words like 'ȝurl' follow English orthographic practice; 'ȝurl' is afterall an English loanword. Long-tailed-z in alternation with <th> is due to the influence of Breton orthography on Cornish. Breton cognates are written with long-tailed-z where Cornish has <th>. This practice is post Norman Conquest. Just as English orthography was influenced by Norman French orthographic practice, so Cornish was influenced by Norman French and Breton orthographic practice. I'm sorry, Jon, but there is no distinction in the pen-strokes. The *letter* is the same *letter*. It is not two different letters with identical shapes. Stokes was right to use the same letter to transcribe both. I will put together something to make this clearer. Michael Everson * http://www.evertype.com/ _______________________________________________ Spellyans mailing list Spellyans at kernowek.net http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net



_____________________________________ 
 Dr. Jon Mills, 
 University of Kent



_____________________________________ 
 Dr. Jon Mills, 
 University of Kent
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