[Spellyans] Is there a future for the SWF?

Christian Semmens christian.semmens at gmail.com
Wed May 16 22:37:10 IST 2012


I think a lot of first time learners don't care if Cornish is written
in Cyrillic, Hangul or Ogham as long as it is "officially" Cornish.
They accept what is presented to them as Cornish. This means that, to
the uninitiated, anything is Cornish if that is what they are told it
is. I doubt that any serious, first-time learner cares much for the
wars, they will pick a camp and sit in it, they may change their minds
as they learn, or they may not, but I doubt they would be disuaded
from continuing. As for the casual learner, they will probably be
blissfully unaware of the wars and just learn from what they bought.

How ever you spell stuff, there will be variability in pronunciation
front loaded by the particular accent of English (or other language)
the learner brings to it. The sad devastating decline in Cornish
accents in the new generations mean that learners will be starting
from an increasingly distant point from the language, especially if
they come at it from the all smothering, vowel strangulation of
English RP. Having an orthography that matches a preferred
pronunciation (perferrably one that actually sounds like it came from
the mouth of a Cornishman) is a definite help. And if it helps top
provide you with word forms that are similar or the same as those
actually written in the manuscripts, this would help you to further
your studies in to the historical sources.

Christian



On 16 May 2012 21:54, ewan wilson <butlerdunnit at ntlworld.com> wrote:
> I can see where Ray is coming from on this.
> I do wonder if 'apathy' or possible waning enthusiasm for the language is
> not down to the fact most learners are not high powered linguistics experts
> and so much of the hotly argued minutiae of things like degrees of stress,
It is, however, essential that this be done as we are attempting to
bind the camps together. However this SWF process now seems to be
merely a way to tear the unused phonology away from the ghastly face
that is KK.
> etc go right over their heads and the consequent conflicts in orthography
> and revival 'brands' dissuade folk from investing in a system that might
> well ultimately be ditched!
> What is the feeling on the ground, I wonder?
>
> Ewan.




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