[Spellyans] January and other months.

ewan wilson butlerdunnit at ntlworld.com
Fri Nov 23 20:36:35 GMT 2012


Fascinating thoughts on the month names. What's the Breton/Welsh equivalents for December? 

Splendid photo, Craig! A very fine looking steed! 
By the way, is the background Penwith landscape, by any chance? Makes one quite nostalgic for Penwith - especially looking out of Glasgow window to exceedingly dull, dreary, damp, 'dreich'  days of endless rain!

Ewan.
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Craig Weatherhill 
  To: Standard Cornish discussion list 
  Sent: Friday, November 23, 2012 7:11 PM
  Subject: Re: [Spellyans] January and other months.


  Thanks, Clive.  I'm glad that someone has answered  - after all, I'm only an amateur, so what do I know?


  That's a very useful thought.  <kevar> does mean "co-tillage".  Now, I'm not a farmer (just a horseman) but, does anyone plough in December?  Does anyone here know?


  Craig




  (PS - after 14 months out of the saddle due to my illness, and Paddy's retirement through old age and arthritis, I'm very pleased to say that I'm back IN the saddle again!  AND it's the BIG man!  The colossal 17.3hh, police trained Shogun!  Am hugely enjoying him, too!  When you look at the photo, remember that I'm 6ft 3ins - then you can gauge his size!).




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  On 2012 Du 23, at 13:32, Clive Baker wrote:


    Hi Craig.,..,. I was trolling through my old cornish books and came across a reference to it that seemed to imply that the kevardhu  was possibly the black ploughing month... it seemed reasonable... but hey... what do I know... <338.gif>... later bud
    Clive


    On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 11:30 AM, Craig Weatherhill <craig at agantavas.org> wrote:

      JANUARY
      Does anyone else think that <mis Genver> should be <mis Jenver>?  It's evidently derived from the Latin "month of Janus", and the attestations are mostly from the Late Cornish period.  These are (from Gendall's source dictionary):

      Genver (Lhuyd)
      Miz Jenvar (Gendall cites 'RW', but doesn't give RW in his list of abbreviations)
      Miz Yenvar (Gwavas)
      "the G soft" (W.A. Jeffery, per Alan St V. Collins, marginal notes in his copy of Williams's 'Lexicon', from trad. words collected from Mousehole and Newlyn).


      OCTOBER
      Does anyone know the derivation/translation of ~<mis Hedra>?

      DECEMBER
      What is "kevar-" in <mis Kevardhu>?

      Craig







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  Thanks, Clive.  I'm glad that someone has answered  - after all, I'm only an amateur, so what do I know?

  That's a very useful thought.  <kevar> does mean "co-tillage".  Now, I'm not a farmer (just a horseman) but, does anyone plough in December?  Does anyone here know?

  Craig


  (PS - after 14 months out of the saddle due to my illness, and Paddy's retirement through old age and arthritis, I'm very pleased to say that I'm back IN the saddle again!  AND it's the BIG man!  The colossal 17.3hh, police trained Shogun!  Am hugely enjoying him, too!  When you look at the photo, remember that I'm 6ft 3ins - then you can gauge his size!).











  On 2012 Du 23, at 13:32, Clive Baker wrote:

  > Hi Craig.,..,. I was trolling through my old cornish books and came across a reference to it that seemed to imply that the kevardhu  was possibly the black ploughing month... it seemed reasonable... but hey... what do I know... <338.gif>... later bud
  > Clive
  > 
  > On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 11:30 AM, Craig Weatherhill <craig at agantavas.org> wrote:
  > JANUARY
  > Does anyone else think that <mis Genver> should be <mis Jenver>?  It's evidently derived from the Latin "month of Janus", and the attestations are mostly from the Late Cornish period.  These are (from Gendall's source dictionary):
  > 
  > Genver (Lhuyd)
  > Miz Jenvar (Gendall cites 'RW', but doesn't give RW in his list of abbreviations)
  > Miz Yenvar (Gwavas)
  > "the G soft" (W.A. Jeffery, per Alan St V. Collins, marginal notes in his copy of Williams's 'Lexicon', from trad. words collected from Mousehole and Newlyn).
  > 
  > 
  > OCTOBER
  > Does anyone know the derivation/translation of ~<mis Hedra>?
  > 
  > DECEMBER
  > What is "kevar-" in <mis Kevardhu>?
  > 
  > Craig
  > 
  > 
  > 
  > 
  > 
  > 
  > 
  > _______________________________________________
  > Spellyans mailing list
  > Spellyans at kernowek.net
  > http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net
  > 
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