[Spellyans] tavas

Daniel Prohaska daniel at ryan-prohaska.com
Tue May 14 22:12:10 IST 2013


On May 14, 2013, at 10:22 PM, Michael Everson wrote:

> 
> On 14 May 2013, at 21:03, Daniel Prohaska <daniel at ryan-prohaska.com> wrote:
> 
>> Nicholas, 
>> I see no unexpected development. It seems regular Pre-OC */taˈvœd/ > OC */ˈtavœd/
> 
> An unattested, hypothetical form of a language no one knows. 

OC ‹tauot› - attested!

> 
>> ~ */ˈtawœd/ 
> 
> An unattested, hypothetical form of a language no one knows. 

OC ‹tauot› - attested!

> 
>> eMidC */ˈtavɛz/ > MC *[ˈtavəz] > LC *[ˈtævɐz]. What's out of the ordinary?
> 
> Sure. Nothing. You're just ignoring the discussion about whether or not any of this reconstructionism is USEFUL FOR ANYTHING.

You use reconstructions where it suits your argument don't you? 

> Knowing Germanic etymology is really useful. When I was 18 I learnt to speak Danish in 12 days because I had read a little grammar, I had studied Old English and Old Norse, and I spoke German. I was able to apply sound changes in my head to devise words to increase my vocabulary. This worked very well for lots of types of vocabulary, which ultimately got borrowed into Nordic as calques from Low German, for instance. 

You are obviously very talented. 

> Speaking Spanish and having studied a little Latin helps you a lot when you start to learn Romanian.

Yes, it does. 

> Does etymology help between Irish and Cornish? Not at all. Is it particularly helpful between Welsh and Cornish or Breton and Cornish? Not really, if you look at the actual Cornish texts.

Oh, but it is. The three Brythonic languages are quite closely related. Stating that they aren't doesn't make it so. Cornish has assibilation, but apart from that there is remarkably little differences. All other features, except PO, can be found in one form or another in the living spoken dialects of Welsh and Breton, including centralising of unstressed vowels and more, dropping of /ð/ or /θ/ in certain environments...

> Breton is a little handy for KK since the 1980s, but that language might well not have been understood by speakers of Traditional Cornish.

18th century fishermen are said to have made themselves understood in Brittany through Cornish. There was also a level of cultural exchange between Brittany and Cornwall until the reformation, so the languages cannot have been as unlike as you claim. 

> Does Proto-Brythonic or Old Cornish help ANYBODY to learn Cornish? 

That's not the point. 

> 
> I do not believe so. It's neither practical (since nobody knows either) nor useful (since the etymological spellings lead to fairly random "patterns" that don't help anyone remember anything. 
> 
> It's starting from the wrong place. The right place to start is the texts. 

Yes. OM contains ‹taves›. 

> 
> The right place to start is the texts. 

Yes. OM contains ‹taves›. 

> 
> The right place to start is the texts. 

Yes. OM contains ‹taves›. 

> 
> The right place to start is the texts. 

Yes. OM contains ‹taves›. 
Dan



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