[Spellyans] Frisian orthography

Craig Weatherhill craig at agantavas.org
Fri Nov 15 12:55:53 GMT 2013


Good God!  That's a ridiculous price!  The original price was £19.95 (hardback).

Craig



On 2013 Du 15, at 12:28, Herbie Blackburn wrote:

> Wow – thanks for that Craig – had a quick look for "Exploration of a Drowned Landscape",  - £257.11 om Amazon! Maybe not just yet then!
>  
> eMail: kevin.blackburn1 at ntlworld.com
> P Please consider the environment before printing this eMail - thanks
>  
> From: Spellyans [mailto:spellyans-bounces at kernowek.net] On Behalf Of Craig Weatherhill
> Sent: 15 November 2013 09:54
> To: Standard Cornish discussion list
> Subject: Re: [Spellyans] Frisian orthography
>  
> Cornish was the language on the Isles of Scilly (often just "Scilly", but never "Scilly Isles", by the way), but its use died out c.1700, earlier than when it became moribund as a community language in West Penwith and the Lizard.  Several Scillonian place-names show Late Cornish characteristics, such as pre-occlusion and S>J.  Scillonian English has developed its own dialect and dialect vocabulary, a paper on the latter being published by Charles Thomas in JRIC some years ago.
>  
> Thomas (whose book: "Exploration of a Drowned Landscape", Batsford 1985; about the archaeology and history of Scilly, is required reading) believed that he had found the Cornish word for "Scillonian" in a record of a man described as "Sullouk", i.e. Syllowek.  The Cornish name for Scilly is well attested as: Syllan (but never "Enesow/Enesek Syllan").  The apparent collective name probably stems from the fact that the bulk of the present islands formed a single land-mass until c.500 AD, with a few off-islands to its SW - the origin of the lost land of Lyonesse legend.  In the now submerged area, round house settlements and field patterns can be seen from the air against the sandy bottom in many places, by virtue of the fact that seaweeds fix themselves to the stone walls.
>  
> Thomas believes that the islands are named after the Celtic goddess Sulis ("sillis"), also commemorated at Bath (Aquae Sulis); her name meaning something like "The Watcher".
>  
> Craig
>  
>  
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