[Spellyans] UCR: 'password'

David Williams gwilliam1497 at gmail.com
Tue Sep 16 08:08:53 IST 2014


If you want to reflect the meaning of knowing a word that allows one to
pass by or through, then John's suggestion is the one for me!

"Hidden or secret word" don't seem to have that meaning.

Gus
On Sep 15, 2014 1:19 PM, "Jon Mills" <j.mills at email.com> wrote:

> *Ger-tremena* is a noun adjective combination in which the adjective, as
> is usual in Cornish, follows the noun. When compounding, the epithet can
> precede the noun that it qualifies. This has the advantage that the plural
> morpheme occurs more conveniently, at the end of the compound: thus *tremen-ger,
> tremen-geryow*. Just a suggestion.
> Ol an gwella,
> Jon
>
>
> _____________________________________
> Dr. Jon Mills,
> University of Kent
> http://kent.academia.edu/JonMills
>
>
> *Sent:* Monday, September 15, 2014 at 10:04 AM
> *From:* "Ray Chubb" <ray at spyrys.org>
> *To:* "Standard Cornish discussion list" <spellyans at kernowek.net>
> *Subject:* Re: [Spellyans] UCR: 'password'
> Without looking in a dictionary I would tend to use, off the cuff,
> 'ger-tremena'. As we already have 'tremencumyas', (passport), which I
> assume was intended to be 'tremengumyas' we could in theory have
> 'tremener'. Again this could be taken to mean a person who passes by.
>
> One of the arguments perhaps for including diacritical marks at all
> times. I think for the purposes of literature or as something barked
> out by a soldier on stage, I have to agree with Eddie that 'ger cuth/
> dh' is the best word.
>
>
>
>
> On 15 Gwn 2014, at 08:59, Eddie Climo wrote:
>
> > A recent search in NJAW's 2006 UCR Dictionary turned up the entry:
> > password. kevrȳnēr; passēr; gēr cüdh.
> >
> > While these three Cornish words may seem acceptable as written in
> > the dictionary with all the diacritics included, consider how they
> > would look in ordinary writing with no diacritics (the recommended
> > option in UCR):
> > password. kervryner; passer; ger cudh.
> >
> > While the meaning of 'ger cudh' is instantly clear to the reader,
> > the first two look as if they should be parsed 'a secreter' and 'a
> > passer' (whatever those might be). Their meaning might be made
> > clearer with a hyphen: 'kevryn-er', 'pass-er', but I shall continue
> > to use 'ger cudh/cuth' as it seems the clearest and the most
> > naturally Cornish.
> >
> > Of course, as with most, if not all, of the Cornish vocabulary in
> > NJAW's dictionary, he give us no indication of which words and
> > expressions are traditional, historically attested Cornish, and
> > which are merely 'Williamsean inventions' (to calque his favourite
> > 'Nancean' slur).
> >
> > Dheugh yn lel,
> >
> > Eddie Climo
> > _______________________________________________
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> > Spellyans at kernowek.net
> > http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net
>
> Ray Chubb
>
> Portreth
> Kernow
>
> Agan Tavas web site: www.agantavas.com
>
>
>
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