<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">And since he was writing Late Cornish he more often than not</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">did not lenite initial consonants. This meant that dhe dhos [to use modern notation</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">remains as dho doaz [or whatever]. This reduces the instances of lenited d.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">There are minimal pairs in Lhuyd that show the phonemic distinction of /D/ and /T/.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Notice: rag tra <b>vêth</b> AB: 222 and ha uelkom ti a <b>vêdh</b> JCH § 15.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 26 Jun 2008, at 16:16, Michael Everson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>At 14:52 +0000 2008-06-26, Jon Mills wrote:<br><br><blockquote type="cite">I have so far been unable to find a minimal contrast pair for <br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Lhuyd's <dh> and <th>. This suggests that in 17th century Cornish, <br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">[D] and [T] are allophones, not separate phonemes.<br></blockquote><br>I don't know that that'd be so. Lhuyd will have had interference from <br>Welsh which may muddy the waters somewhat.<br>-- <br>Michael Everson * <a href="http://www.evertype.com">http://www.evertype.com</a><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></div></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>