<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On 24 Jun 2008, at 14:59, Owen Cook wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">2008/6/24 A. J. Trim <<a href="mailto:ajtrim@msn.com">ajtrim@msn.com</a>>:</div> <blockquote type="cite"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">The Late Cornish chei, kei, crei could be written chy, ky, cry.</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">Final <y> could be an umbrella graph for the <-i> & <-ei> of the current</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">SWF, and the result looks more authentically based on Tudor spelling.</div> </blockquote><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; min-height: 14px; "><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">Yes, I agree with this suggestion too.</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Late Cornish may choose to write 'chei, kei, crei', but I shall not.</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; min-height: 14px; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-text-stroke-width: -1; ">Actually, Jenner wrote y-circumflex in such items, and personally I</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">think this would be the best solution for our purposes as well.</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">(Michael, however, will raise font limitations as an objection.</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">Personally, I rarely use a font unless it has extensive Unicode</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">support, so this is irrelevant to me, but there's probably something</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">to it for the majority of Cornish users.)</div></blockquote><div><br></div>(1) I use whatever legal fonts I can get my hands on, and some older ones are available cheaply. Moreover, as MacOS X is agnostic on the matter, I run both Mac and Windows fonts.</div><div><br></div><div>(2) I can't afford to buy new, Unicode-compliant replacements for all my favourite older fonts.</div><div><br></div><div>(3) My fonts vary enormously in which of the more 'exotic' characters and accents they offer. It's not realistic for me to have to inspect every single font before I use it to see which of the accented <y Y>s it contains. For example, looking at a few of the many fontsinstalled on my Mac, I find this:</div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><div><b>Arrow:</b> <y> umlaut - lower case only</div><div><b><br></b></div><div><b>Baskerville:</b><y Y> umlaut, acute</div><div><b><br></b></div><div><b>Times:</b> <y Y> umlaut, acute, circumflex, macron, dot above, grave, dot below, and loads of double and triple diacritics I've never seen before.</div></blockquote></div><div><br></div><div>(4) MacOS comes with a pretty good bundle of fonts, but they also vary enormously in the repertoire of characters each one offers.</div><div><br>If KS is going to have an accented <y Y>, then the only solution I can see is the one I mentioned earlier: have a recommended accent, but accept any other accent (or none) if that's all an individual can get on their computer.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><div>Eddie Foirbeis Climo</div><div><a href="mailto:eddie_climo@yahoo.co.uk">eddie_climo@yahoo.co.uk</a></div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</div><div><i>Is sos a' bhothar fada gun elas 's a thid sinn.</i></div><div><i>Ahes an forth hyr hep wothvos y tremenynyn.</i></div><div>It's the long and unknown road we pass along.</div></div></body></html>