<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Not only is this unjustified theoretically, it appears to be ignored in speech as well. KK users say arlùth. Just as they say tavaz for <taves>.<div><br><div><div>On 3 Feb 2009, at 14:01, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 128); font-family: 'Doulos SIL'; font-size: 13px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; "><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>but rather assumes a context conditioned variation of [ð] and [θ] in unstressed syllables where etymologically /ð/ is expected, i.e. British /d/ or intervocalic /j/.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>