<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">As far as I can see, there are three forms in Cornish alternate final -w with internal -v- or -f-.</span></font><div><br></div><div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The first is "fleece", which is spelt <knew> by Tregear. The verb knyvya 'to shear', however, he spells <knevys> in the verbal adjective:</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">kepar hag one ledys then folde the vos knevys y knew the veis  'like a lamb led to the fold to have his fleece shorn away' TH 23.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The second such item is the word for "nut", which Jon has mentioned in another posting today.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This Lhuyd writes as <kynyfan>, <kynyphan>, where the y is dotten to render a short mid-high rounded vowel. The simplex *know is not attested in the texts, but does occur in some early forms of the place-name Callenowth < kelly know "nut grove".</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The third item is the word for "flood", which is attested in the singular as <lyf> seven times in OM, and as <lew> in the expression lew Noye "Noah's flood" at TH 7.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The plural form, however, is <lyvyow>, which occurs twice in CW.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The singular lyf in OM, in KS should probably be written <liv>, with a long vowel [i:] and a final [v]. The plural, then, would be <livyow> in KS, by the rule that <i> in the singular is retained in the plural, cf. tir, tiryow.I prefer, however, to write "flood" in the singular as <lyw> but the plural as <livyow>, keeping the alternation w/v, with final <w> in the monosyllabic form. I am not bothered that lyw "flood" and lyw "colour" are written and pronounced the same. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Similarly I should write <knofen> and <know> and <knevya> and <knew> or possibly <knyvya> and <knyw>. There is no difference in pronunciation between <knew> and <knyw>. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><div>On 25 Du 2009, at 16:11, <a href="mailto:j.mills@email.com">j.mills@email.com</a> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><font color="black" size="2" face="arial"> <div>Lhuyd (1707: 170c) gives the form "knu" for English 'fleece'. George (GKK) gives this word as "knyv". Should we write this word with final <-w> or <-v>?</div> <div>Jon<br> <br> </div> <div style="CLEAR: both">_____________________________________ <br> Dr. Jon Mills, <br> School of European Culture and Languages, <br> University of Kent</div> <div style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; FONT-FAMILY: arial"> <div id="AOLMsgPart_4_77a79b15-0d8b-4a60-a086-2a6c91e95075" style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; MARGIN: 0px; COLOR: #000; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, Sans-Serif; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #fff"><pre style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt"> </pre></div> <!-- end of AOLMsgPart_4_77a79b15-0d8b-4a60-a086-2a6c91e95075 --></div> </font> _______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></body></html>