<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Nance's mer is based on Welsh mêr 'marrow, fat', which is probably the same word as Irish smior 'marrow'.<div>Lhuyd's maru on the other hand looks like a borrowing from Middle English marow. </div><div>In which case marow is the attested word and mer is a neologism. They are different words, however.</div><div>Breton mel 'marrow' seems to be a borrowing of French moelle < Latin medulla. </div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br><div><div>On 5 Gen 2010, at 13:00, <a href="mailto:j.mills@email.com">j.mills@email.com</a> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><font color="black" size="2" face="arial"> <div>Morton Nance (1938) gives "mer" for English 'bone-marrow', and marks it with an asterisk to indicate a neologism. Lhuyd (1707: 15b, 87c) gives "marụ". Is there any justification for retaining the form "mer"? I am aware of the Welsh "mêr" (bone-marrow), which was possibly the basis for Nance's neologism.</div> <div>Jon<br> <br> </div> <div style="CLEAR: both">_____________________________________ <br> Dr. Jon Mills, <br> School of European Culture and Languages, <br> University of Kent</div> <br> </font> _______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>