<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Lhuyd's collective <i>panez</i> is probably not the same word as his singular <i>panan</i>. <i>Panan</i> < MC *panen is a singulative feminine derived from the obsolete English word <i>pane</i> 'parsnip (<i>Pastinaca sativa</i>)'. Pane itself may have come from Middle English <i>panage</i> 'right of feeding pigs', though has probably been contaminated by the word for 'parsnip'.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>Panez</i> is not the plural of <i>panan</i>, but a collective plural from an unattested singulative *<i>panesen</i> (as was suggested by Nance). Nance's *<i>panesen</i> was conjectured on the basis of Breton <i>panezenn</i> 'parsnip'. The Breton singulative <i>panezenn</i> has a collective plural <i>panez</i> (cf. Lhuyd's <i>panez</i>), itself derived from Old French <i>pasnaie, panais</i> 'parsnip'. French <i>panais</i> derives from Latin <i>pastinaca</i> 'parsnip'. A learned French form <i>pastinaque</i> is also attested, which was adopted in English as *<i>pasneque</i> and then reshaped on the basis of <i>turnep</i>, <i>turnip</i>, where the element -<i>nep</i> means 'root vegetable'. </span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Lhuyd also give <i>turnypan</i> 'turnip (Brassica rapa)' AB: 136b  where the form is clearly singulative. </span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Since <i>panan</i> and <i>panez</i> are not the same word, since *<i>panezen</i>, *<i>panesen</i> is the naturally derived singular of the attested <i>panez</i>, since Breton <i>panez</i>, <i>panezenn</i> is exactly comparable, and since Lhuyd cites a singulative <i>tyrnypan < turnypen</i>, I can see nothing wrong with collective <i>panes</i>, singulative *<i>panesen</i> in revived Cornish.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></font></div><div><br></div><div>In English pa<br><div><div>On 15 Gen 2010, at 10:32, <a href="mailto:j.mills@email.com">j.mills@email.com</a> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: arial; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; ">Morton Nance (1938) gives the singulative "panesen" for 'parsnip'. The only attestation that I have found is Lhuyd (1707: 114a, 240c) who gives "panan". Lhuyd (1707: 14c, 33a, 114a, 243a) gives the plural as "panez". Are we justified in writing a singulative form "panesen"?</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>