<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Hear, hear. </span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Jenner's spelling system was abandoned by Nance who preferred a more medieval, and indeed quaint, orthography.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Moreover, because he was such a poor linguist, Nance ignored crucial distinctions in the phonology of Cornish.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This was one of the reasons that people became so dissatisfied with UC. Unfortunately, the cure (KK) was much worse</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">than the disease.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The deification of Nance was part of the problem. If Nance had been a good a linguist as Jenner,</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">UC would have been more satisfactory and and KK would not have done so much damage.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">And Nance's idees fixes weren't confined to orthography but gave a false impression of the syntax, idiom</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">and lexicon of Cornish as well. I remember when I was writing Cornish Today how astonished I was on reading the texts </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">(minus BK of course) several times and realising that Ywerdhon 'Ireland', kenethel 'nation', enep 'face', avon 'river', myl 'animal', tron 'nose',</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">etc. etc. were all Nancean wishful thinking and that the words used by Cornish speaking Cornishmen had been Wordhen, nacyon, fas,</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">ryver, best and frigow. I also realised that Nance deliberately suppressed such forms as gansans, dhedhans, and refused to countenance</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">items like me a veu 'I had'. Nance also wanted to believe that forms like dewdros 'feet' and dewlagas 'eyes' were common, whereas</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">the ordinary words are treys and lagasow. In fact dywscovarn is unknown and the only attested form is scovornow [sic!].</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">KS is an attempt (as was Jenner's orthography) to bridge the gap between Middle and Late Cornish.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">As such, KS is very close to Jenner. So in 2010 a spelling system is being used that is very similar to</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Jenner (1904). </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Interestingly KS is not particularly far from SWF/T though it shuns <iw> and unstressed -ev and -edh (e.g. *genev and *menedh),</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">and avoids "etymological" spellings like <melin> and <niver>. It is also tighter and less leaky in other ways.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Michael deserves great credit for the way he has applied his expertise in writing systems to the spelling of Cornish.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Still, in the Cornish revival one never gets praise, just criticism, carping and disparagement.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Craig knows that, so does Michael and so do I. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I have no doubt that in the long term the generally accepted orthography for Cornish will be something resembling</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Jenner and KS. It probably will be fairly similar to SWF/T as well, minus the errors carried over from KK. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Of the three SWF is the only orthography designed by non-linguists, and it shows.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">An introductory grammar will soon appear in KS. Translations in it have already been published</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">and more are on the way. I write in KS because I cannot use the SWF, which is so incoherent.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Anyone who can read SWF will have no difficulty with KS and vice versa. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The phonology is the same. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I am sure that SWF/M and SWF/T will have pretty short shelf-lives. Even if I don't live to see it,</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I am confident that they will ultimately be replaced by something better.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I certainly support the use of the SWF but I can't use it. Quite simply, it isn't good enough.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br></div><div><div><div>On 19 Me 2010, at 20:38, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; ">In the meantime, can we please cut out the: "Bollocks"; "Nonsense"; "Have you got a crystal ball", etc.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>