<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">It is better to use attested words, even when they are borrowings, rather than coin "Celtic" words, or use words that were in Old Cornish but appear to have gone out of use in Middle Cornish.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nance preferred <b>stevel</b> 'room' from Old Cornish to <b>rom</b> 'room' of Middle Cornish, and <b>tron</b> 'nose' from OC <b>trein</b>, to the attested <b>dewfrik</b> or <b>frigow</b>. He also used *<b>avon</b> 'river', though the word in Middle Cornish is <b>ryver</b>, and <b>enep</b> 'face', though the word is not once attested in Middle Cornish, being replaced by <b>fas</b>. Nance taught that <b>myl</b> [mil] was the Cornish for 'animal', but the regular word is <b>best</b>, <b>bestas</b>. Similarly 'cloud' was *<b>comolen</b>, whereas the only attested word in the texts is <b>cloud</b>, <b>cloudys</b>. Some people for 'purse' now say *<b>yalgh</b>, a borrowing from Breton, but the word <b>pors</b> is attested four times in <i>Beunans Meriasek.</i> I could point to a discussion in print about the relative frequencies of <b>lowena</b> 'joy' and <b>lowender</b> 'happiness, joy'. In fact by far the commonest word in the texts is <b>joy</b>.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The question is not one of preference, but of remaining faithful to Cornish as actually spoken and written by Cornish people. Or one might put it another way: revivalists have no right to reshape the language in their own image. Cornish is as we find it, and purism is artificial and inauthentic. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This is true of morphology as well. So the unattested *<b>dywscovarn</b> is not to preferred over the attested <b>scovornow</b>, or the unattested *<b>dywarr</b> 'legs' over the attested <b>garrow</b>. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The same principle can also be invoked with orthography. There is no need to write <b>hweg</b>, when the attested form is <b>wheg</b>, or *<b>orthiv</b> when the attested spellings are <b>orthyf</b> and <b>orthaf</b>.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 29 Me 2010, at 22:06, ewan wilson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: small; ">Personally, I find that many of the items taken over from  the English and Norman French lend Cornish its own peculiar expressiveness that the 'purer' Celtic languages perhaps lack. However I am aware that fears for the language being swamped by forgein lexical items can understandably lead to a preferance for a purer lexical base.</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>