<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On 30 Me 2010, at 18:12, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><div> I am happy to use <awan> or <ryver>; flowr> or <blejen>.  Their existence in traditional Cornish is beyond doubt, and the choice gives the advantage of allowing extensions of vocabulary, so useful in written Cornish especially, where one doesn't want to keep using one word where alternatives are available.</div></blockquote><br></div><div>Unverhe yn tyen a wraf gans dha lavar skentyl, Craig. Hen yu gwyr styr an lavar 'Tota Cornicitas' y'm brus-vy: Kernewek oll a bup os, Kernewek Coth po K.Cres po K,Modern po K.Dasserghys kyn fo. (Gwell yu tewlel KK bys y'n deylek hep mar, hag ef hep bos moy es "skyl-Kornyk" devysys gans nep skyl-frattyer!)</div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas wrote:</div><div><blockquote type="cite">Because a word occurs in toponyms, it does not follow that it was a living word in the Middle and Late language.</blockquote><br></div><div>True, but irrelevant. We're trying to use Revived Cornish, not the language from 300 or 500 or 1,000 years ago. It's inevitable that RC will be a diachronic mixture of items from various periods. The most we can hope for is to choose to focus more on the MC or TC or LC period.</div><div><br></div><div>I notice in passing that NJAW (2006) offers the following entries in his UCR dictionary (I omit the plurals & diacritics):</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">   </span>animal.</b> best. myl eneval</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">  </span>cloud.</b> clowd, comolen. newlen</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">     </span>face.</b> fas. bejeth. vysach. gruef. enep</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">    </span>flower.</b> flowr. flowren. blejen. blejyowen</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>joy</b>. lowena. lowender. joy</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>leg and thigh.</b> gar, <i>dual</i> dewar</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>nose.</b> dewfryk. tron</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>room</b>. rom. stevel. chambour</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>scovarn</b>. <i>dual</i> dewscovarn, <i>pl</i>. scovarnow</div><div><br></div><div>Now, a mere 4 years later, he tells us that some of these words that he offered us then must now NOT BE USED! Well, pshaw! What might KS2 look like in a further 4 years' time, if opinions are going to be as fleeting as this?!</div><div><br></div><div>No, I shall take the long view, I think, and stick to UC for a few decades more, until the dust has settled down a bit (or till I've done the dust-to-dust bit myself!). After all, UC has given the Revival some 90 years of sterling service and is still going strong ; and its founding fathers (and mothers!) have well-earned places of honour in the history of our language.</div><div><br></div><div>Ha ny yllyr leverel yndella rak an 'Jowannow noweth devedhys' a'n jeth hedhyu, a ny yllyr!</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Foirbeis Climo</div><div>-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -</div><div>"Kemer wyth na wreta gasa an forth coth rag an forth noweth."</div></body></html>