<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I often use <b>enep</b> for 'surface' and <b>fss</b> for 'face'. Both Keigwin and John Boson use <b>bejeth</b> for the 'face of the waters' in Genesis 1.2: <i>tewlder wor </i><b><i>bedgeth</i></b><i> an downder</i> Keigwi</span><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">n; <i>ha spiriz Deu reeg guaya var </i><b><i>budgeth</i></b><i> an dour</i> JBoson.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Though Keigwin uses <b>enep</b> at Genesis 1.29: <i>E ma reaze gennan thu keneffra lazoan toane haaz a eze wor <b>enapp</b> an Noare</i> [Yma rs genen</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">dhywgh kenyver losowen ow ton has eus wr enep an nor].</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px; "><br></span></font></div><div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville"><br></font><div><div>On 31 Me 2010, at 09:13, Ray Chubb wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">If I wanted to say the surface of the sea I would continue to use 'eneb an mor' because it just sounds right.  In other situations I would probably use 'fas'.<br></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></body></html>