<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On 19 Efn 2010, at 18:19, Chris Parkinson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div bgcolor="#ffffff" style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><font face="Arial" size="2">... it would be a big help to many learners if late Cornish could be transcribed authentically, without the wholesale alterations of vocabulary and morphology which have characterised some published versions of late Cornish.</font></div></div></span></blockquote><br></div><div>True enough. Just as bad (if not worse!), there have been published versions of MC-based UC writings that have suffered "wholesale alterations of vocabulary and morphology", not to mention spelling. syntax and grammar. </div><div><br></div><div>Ass ens-y 'hubrystek'! Re dhrehaffo an dus gablus aga dorn!</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div></body></html>