<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">What Albert says is partially true. Historic /l/ and /l:/ are indeed distinct in SA (itself a rather short text). It cannot be assumed, however, that the distinction is of necessity one of length. It is also possible that the difference is one of voicing, and that <ll> in SA may be on occasion a graph for [lh]. (I follow Albert’s notation here, using <lh> for voiceless l).</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><lh> in TH and SA  is written for voiceless [lh], e.g. <i>pelha. </i>In BK, however, <lh> is written for historic /l:/ e.g. <i>ellas</i> ‘alas!’. And indeed <i>elhas</i> for <i>ellas</i> ‘alas’ is first attested in PA.</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">The form <i>malla</i> <<i> may halla</i> has <ll> in SA but the same verbal form is <i>alho</i> in BK i.e. with <lh>. </span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">It seems probable that in some dialects of  Middle Cornish the distinction between original intervocalic /l/ and /l:/ has already been reshaped as a distinction between /l/ and /lh/.</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">The same appears to be the case with /n/ and /n:/, i.e. that the distinction has been reshaped as a difference in voicing. In BK, for example, <i>cannas</i> ‘messenger’ is frequently <canhas>. Elsewhere in BK (and in MC in general) <nh> appears to represent a voiceless consonant, e.g. in <i>lowenhys</i> ‘gladdened’, <i>inhy</i> ‘in her’, where the devoicing has been caused in both cases by an earlier lenited <i>s</i>.</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">Albert says that <lh> is only ever written in SA for /l+h/ or /ll+h/. This may be true in SA, but it is not true in MC as a whole. I have counted  <ellas> ‘alas’ 82 times in the texts. <elhas> occurs 21 times. It would be rash to suggest, then, that <lh> and <ll> are phonetically distinct in Middle Cornish.</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">L and n are not completely parallel here. CW confuses historic /l/ and /l:/, writing them both as <ll>. It has not, however, conflated /n/ and /n:/ since in CW historic /n:/ has been pre-occluded. </span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">A proper study of all the attested texts is required and the spelling <l>, <ll>, <lh> need to be isolated and tabulated. </span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">In intervocalic position historic /l/ and /l:/ are indeed phonemically different in some of the MC texts The question remains, however, what is the phonetic reality.</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; min-height: 14px; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"></span><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px">Nicholas</span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><br></div><div><div>On 21 Gor 2010, at 12:24, <a href="mailto:j.mills@email.com">j.mills@email.com</a> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><font color="black" size="2" face="arial"> <div>Comments please on Bock's recent paper.</div> <div><a href="http://homepage.univie.ac.at/albert.bock/archive/l_ll_lh_SA.pdf">http://homepage.univie.ac.at/albert.bock/archive/l_ll_lh_SA.pdf</a></div> <div> </div> <div>Ol an gwella,</div> <div>Jon<br> </div> <div style="CLEAR: both">_____________________________________ <br> Dr. Jon Mills, <br> School of European Culture and Languages, <br> University of Kent</div> </font> _______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></body></html>