<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">CW doesn't appear to distinguish /l:/ from /l/, since it writes <wellas> for <welas> 'saw'. But so does does Tregear. Tregear sometimes writes <pella> (x 17)  but he also writes <pelha> (x 13). CW writes <ethlays> 'alas' at CW 1040. This seems to be a back-spelling for *<elhs>. It would seem that CW has lost the distinction /l: ~ l/ but still has /lh/. In which one might expect either *<na felha> or <na *fethla> in CW. But CW always writes <na fella> 'no longer'.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Rowe writes <Mr pelha avel Jordan> but Gwavas writes <pella>.<br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Two further points. Lhuyd tells us he heard initial /r/ pronounced without voicing. (I am in Mayo and haven't the reference to hand.) Secondly, the reflex of /l:/ in Welsh is a voiceless lateral. Voicelessness as a possible element in realisation of historic /l:/ in Cornish is quite likely. The long /l/ of Cornu-English might be relevant here, or it might be a red herring. <br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas<br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><div>On 23 Gor 2010, at 12:01, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 128); font-family: Gentium; font-size: 16px; ">was realised as voiceless or geminate will remain a matter of theory, but what we can say, is that the author of SA most likely retained the contrast of <l> : <ll> ~ <lh>.</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></div></div></body></html>