<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Tregear writes <pelha> x 12 and <pella>  and <pelha> x 18.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In TH <lh> and <ll> would seem to be interchangeable graphs.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas Boson writes <telhar> x 4 in Nebbaz Gerriau, but <tellar> in JCH. For Boson <lh> and <ll> appear</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">to be interchangeable graphs.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The scribe of BK writes <uhella> x 2.  He writes <uhelha> x 5. For the scribe of BK <lh> and <ll> seem to be</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">interchangeable.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The first chapter of Genesis by John Keigwin (?) writes <andellha Eth o> 'and it was so' x 1; <andellha eth o> x 2 but he also writes <andella eth o> x 1. He also writes <gwellaz troua Daa> 'saw that it was good'  x 1, <wellhaz trova da> x 1 and </span><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><wellhaz treuah dah> x 1. He also writes</span><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"> <deew a wellaz keneffra tra> 'saw everything' x 1. <llh> and <ll> would seem to be interchangeable graphs to him.</span></font></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Rowe writes </span><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><an Stearan a reeg an Gye gwellhaz en East> 'the star which they saw in the East'. But he also writes </span><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><Peręg an Gye gwellaz an Steran> 'when they saw the star'. For Rowe <llh> and <ll> seem to be interchangeable.</span></font></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The above are only a handful of examples. I am yet to be convinced that in Middle and Late Cornish <lh>/ <llh> and <ll> represented different sounds.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 23 Gor 2010, at 23:03, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 16px; ">“I see that Nicholas has replied to my short paper on the Spellyans list. Unfortunately there is no single list or forum that he and I are both subscribed to, so I will have to answer here.<br><br><i><span style="font-style: italic; ">"Albert says that <lh> is only ever written in SA for /l+h/ or /ll+h/. This may be true in SA, but it is not true in MC as a whole. I have counted <ellas> ‘alas’ 82 times in the texts. <elhas> occurs 21 times. It would be rash to suggest, then, that <lh> and <ll> are phonetically distinct in Middle Cornish."</span></i><br></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>