This is outside of my competences, however it strikes me that the spelling in CW <font face="Georgia" size="5"><span style="font-size: 18px;"><ethlays> </span></font>would perhaps suggest an attempt to produce a Welsh 'll' voiceless lateral fricative sound, but perhaps less pronounced than in Welsh?<br>
<br>Chris<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 23 July 2010 17:43, nicholas williams <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:njawilliams@gmail.com">njawilliams@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<div style="word-wrap: break-word;"><font face="Georgia" size="5"><span style="font-size: 18px;">CW doesn't appear to distinguish /l:/ from /l/, since it writes <wellas> for <welas> 'saw'. But so does does Tregear. Tregear sometimes writes <pella> (x 17)  but he also writes <pelha> (x 13). CW writes <ethlays> 'alas' at CW 1040. This seems to be a back-spelling for *<elhâs>. It would seem that CW has lost the distinction /l: ~ l/ but still has /lh/. In which one might expect either *<na felha> or <na *fethla> in CW. But CW always writes <na fella> 'no longer'.</span></font><br>
</div></blockquote></div>