<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I was the deviser of UCR. I recommended it in <i>Cornish Today</i> as a way of retaining the link with the traditional Cornish texts but also attempting to systematise their spelling </span></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">and to remove some of the inconsistencies in Unified Cornish. At the same time I criticised KK as being based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the sound system </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">of Cornish and as using a very largely concocted spelling. This criticism, coming as it did from a professional student of the Celtic languages, did little to endear me or my efforts to many, and as a result UCR was never allowed as </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">a spelling for Gorsedd examinations. In consequence UCR did not replace UC; and of course KK users would not touch it, since it was the work of the severest critic of KK.</span><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I did not "dump" UCR. I withdrew my support for it because I believed that it was too inconsistent and too difficult to be used as a compromise orthography for the  </span></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">whole revival. Instead, with others, I was involved in the elaboration of KS which has the merit of using traditional graphs (for the most part) and being almost entirely </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">phonetic. It is immediately apparent from the spelling of KS how it is to be pronounced. In this respect KS is superior to SWF/T, which for example, has no </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">way of distinguishing the three separate pronunciations of <u> (as short u, long u and long French u [y:]). It is of course also greatly superior to SWF/M which uses spellings alien to traditional Cornish (notably <hw>, <kw> and <i> in chi 'house', etc.); as well as whole string of "etymological" spellings. In SWF, for example, "book" is <i>lyver</i> and "number" is <i>niver</i>, but the words are a perfect rhyme.  "We see" is <i>gwelyn</i> and "mill" is <i>melin</i> in the SWF, but the two words rhyme perfectly. </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">"Tongue, language" is invariably</span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; "> </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; "><i>tavas</i></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; "> </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">in the Cornish texts, but the SWF spells the word <taves>. There are many, many more examples of such unnecessary distinctions in the SWF.</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The essential point to remember, I think, is this: since Cornish has no native speakers whose speech we can imitate, we need a spelling which is as clear and as unambiguous as possible. </span></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">Unless our spelling is phonetic on the one hand and firmly rooted in traditional Cornish spelling, it will not survive.</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I am convinced that the SWF as it stands, in both its main and traditional forms, needs to undergo major revision. A revision is scheduled in 2013. I hope that such a revision proves sufficient</span></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">. If not, I believe that the SWF will ultimately be abandoned<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 17px; "></span>to be replaced by a more traditional and less ambiguous orthography. </span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas Williams</span></font></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; "> </span></div><div><br></div><div><div><div>On 22 Est 2010, at 20:17, WILSON NANCY wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">for all it has been so prematurely dumped by most,<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>