<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">To the modern reader it seems as though Tregear didn't have a sufficiently large Cornish vocabulary.<div>His listeners on the other hand were probably greatly impressed by his command of theological language—albeit in English.</div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 24 Est 2010, at 09:28, <a href="mailto:j.mills@email.com">j.mills@email.com</a> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial; font-size: small; ">I think that the reason Tregear's Cornish is the way it is, is because it is only a rough draft. I suspect Tregear's Cornish was much better than is evident from this manuscript. But we will probably never know.</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>