<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">There's also the comparative <i>the belha ha the weusa</i> 'further and more wanderingly' TH 17a. This is from <i>gwyus</i> in UC, our <i>gwius</i>.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><div>On 2010 Hed 9, at 20:19, Michael Everson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>I was talking to Nicholas about "gloryes" 'glorious' and he gave me the following similar examples:<br><br>gracius, gracyus, grassijs, grassyes, grassyeys, grassies<br><br>ongrassijs, ongrassyeys, ongrassyes, ongrassijs, ongrassyas, vngrasshes<br><br>precius, precyous, precyus, presivs, presius, presyus<br><br>contraryus<br><br>Nance has:<br><br>contraryus<br>delycyous<br>dyscrassyes<br>envȳes<br>grassyes<br>*melodyes<br>precyous<br>spȳtys (< ME spytus)<br>ungrassyes<br>vyctōryes<br><br>All of these (except spȳtys) have the same origin, ME -ious < Lat -iosus<br><br>Ought we not write, regularly, the following?<br><br>contraryùs<br>delycyùs<br>dyscrassyùs<br>enviùs<br>grassyùs<br>*melodyùs<br>precyùs<br>spîtùs (?)<br>ungrassyùs<br>vyctoryùs<br><br>It does not seem to make sense to have -yus and -yous and -yes since the etymology and pronunciation is the same.<br><br>Michael Everson * <a href="http://www.evertype.com/">http://www.evertype.com/</a><br><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></div></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>