On 16 November 2010 09:40, Daniel Prohaska <<a href="mailto:daniel@ryan-prohaska.com">daniel@ryan-prohaska.com</a>> wrote:<br>> well<br>> liked and formulated rule that all consonants are devoiced in this position,<br>
> if there is evidence to the contrary. <br><br><i>s</i> was not devoiced in this position, as Lhuyd's "tavaz" and similar examples prove. Which suggests that stops and fricatives might have patterned differently... (In itself, that would be no extraordinary thing. French <t> and <d> in liaisons is /t/, while <s> and <z> are /z/.) Now whether <i>f</i> or <i>th</i> were similarly devoiced is open to question, but I agree with Dan that the evidence is not so one-sided as to require the Revival as a whole to adhere to a single dogmatic position on the issue. If Nicholas and Michael are in a position to convince everybody otherwise, however, then more power to them.<br>
<br>~~Owen