<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">With all due respect George has no theory. He says of the voicing/devoicing in stressed and unstressed syllables:</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">"it is a phonetic problem, and one which cannot be solved in the absence of traditional Cornish speakers" (KKC21: 157). That is not a theory.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">It is an admission that he cannot explain the matter—which did not by the way stop his overthrowing the accepted orthography of Cornish and splitting the revival.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">My view is that the lenis after an unstressed vowel was devoiced and was voiced after a stressed one.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This is systematic and affects p/b. k/g, th/dh and f/dh. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">When I suggested writing <i>th</i> for <i>dh</i> I meant only that dhe was not part of the inventory of traditional Cornish. I never suggested, as you know perfectly well, that the medial segment in <i>cotha</i> 'older' and <i>cotha</i>/<i>codha</i> 'to fall' were the same.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">You have come nowhere near to convincing me that I am mistaken.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">You have suggested no coherent and systematic reason for Lhuyd's variations. <i>guironedh</i>/<i>guironeth</i>, <i>nowydh</i>/<i>noweth</i>. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">You have suggested no explanation for such forms as <i>sewenaffa</i> and <i>genaffa</i> in CW.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">You haven't suggested why the texts regularly write <i>geneff</i>, etc.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Your only example not from Lhuyd is <i>gwreanathe</i> in CW, which as I have pointed out, proves nothing—since CW also writes <i>whathe</i>, <i>Sethe</i>, <i>forsothe</i>, etc., where the final segment must be voiceless.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Lhuyd is useful, but he is not infallible. He writes <i>uarnav</i> and <i>genev</i>. But such forms with final v after an unstressed vowel occur in his writing only and nowhere else in the remains of Cornish. On the other hand, though they are not common, examples of final v after a stressed vowel are found sporadically and in increasing numbers from the Ordinalia onwards.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Traditional Cornish sometimes writes <i>ov</i> 'I am', <i>nev</i> 'heaven', <i>ev</i> 'he'. Traditional Cornish never writes <i>warnav</i> or <i>genev</i>. How do you explain that?</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">It seems to me that you are trying to defend final unstressed <i>dh</i> and <i>v</i> only because they are in KK and therefore in SWF.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">But in recent times the first person to change <i>myghterneth</i> to <i>myghterneth</i> and <i>genef</i> to <i>genev</i> was KG and he can't explain why.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">You will forgive me for not agreeing to write <i>gwiryonedh</i> and <i>genev</i>.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I will not write forms that I believe to be wrong.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2010 Du 18, at 18:13, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div style="margin-top: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm; margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; margin-left: 0cm; font-size: 12pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font size="3" color="navy" face="Gentium"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Gentium; color: navy; ">that your theory is right and Ken George’s theory is wrong, not when we have so little to go by.<o:p></o:p></span></font></div><div style="margin-top: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm; margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; margin-left: 0cm; font-size: 12pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font size="3" color="navy" face="Gentium"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Gentium; color: navy; ">Dan</span></font></div></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>