<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville">Lhuyd writes <i>neuydh</i>, <i>nouydh</i> when transcribing from MSS. What he actually heard appears in  JCH where he writes<b><i> noueth</i></b> §6 and an <b><i>noueT</i></b> (with a Greek tau, which means <th>) at §16. </font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville"><br></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville">If he had written only neuydh, nowydh, Dan might have a point. Since he often writes nowydh but also noweth we have to ask ourselves why. Nowydh is by false analogy with Welsh. Noweth in JCH is what he heard.</font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville"><br></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville">Nicholas</font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Baskerville"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: x-large;"><br></span></font><div><div>On 2010 Du 18, at 09:13, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 128); font-family: Gentium; font-size: 16px; ">It’s a bit sad that I can only be seen as arguing from “our side of the fence” when I accept the dogma that that<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><b><i><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; ">nowyth</span></i></b><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>should be spelt with final <<b><i><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; ">th</span></i></b>> rather than <<b><i><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; ">dh</span></i></b>>, despite the fact that the one scholar who heard and recorded living traditional Cornish wrote<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><b><i><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; ">nowydh</span></i></b>,<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><b><i><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; ">neụedh</span></i></b><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>and<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><b><i><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; ">neụydh</span></i></b>.</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>