<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>Ef</i> 'he' and <i>geneff</i> 'with me' would have been a good idea, perhaps.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The only trouble is that final f would be pronounced as [f]. Some UC speakers</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">make this mistake.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">As for <i>dh/th</i>, I prefer to interpret the variation as similar to that of</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>k/g, p/b, f/v</i> rather than some rather ad hoc pausa/allegro construct.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">We don't seem to have any other alternation of this kind in Cornish.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">We should also remember that Lhuyd apparently never actually visited the far west of Cornwall</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">where the language was most spoken. According to Derek Williams' map in</span></font></div><div><i><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Prying into Every Hole and Corner</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"> Lhuyd did not visit anywhere further west than Camborne.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Lhuyd spent between three and four months in Cornwall. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Most of the material in AB was garnered from manuscripts and lists sent him.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Which he then collected and edited in Oxford.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Lhuyd clearly did not understand Cornish syntax and makes the most elementary</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">mistakes in his Cornish preface. He clearly also often assumed that Cornish was the</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">same as Welsh. Look for example of his treatment of the autonomous forms</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">of the verb in Cornish where he gives us such bizarre forms as:</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Ez yzhiz a'n henual 'We are called'</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Henuassiz vi 'I had been called'</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Henuer di 'Be thou named' AB: 247ab.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Such forms are figments of the Cambrian imagination.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">They have no support at all in the Cornish texts.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I suspect that some at least of his phonological representations are similarly imaginary.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2010 Du 19, at 08:19, Owen Cook wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">On a not totally unrelated note, I would really like to see a return<br>to the use of final <f> for /v/, final <ff> for /f/, which I thought<br>was one of the most elegant features of an earlier incarnation of KS.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>