<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<html xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">

<head>

<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 11 (filtered medium)">
<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:Gentium;
        panose-1:2 0 5 3 6 0 0 2 0 4;}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:Gentium;}
@page Section1
        {size:595.3pt 841.9pt;
        margin:70.85pt 68.3pt 2.0cm 68.3pt;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body lang=DE link=blue vlink=purple>

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Michael Everson<br>
Sent: Saturday, November 20, 2010 1:09 PM</span></font><span lang=EN-GB><br>
<br>
</span><span lang=EN-GB><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“On 20 Nov 2010, at 11:38, Daniel Prohaska wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>>> “On has to interpret medieval texts and other
texts with low or incipient standardization. Sometimes that interpretation
takes into account more than just the marks on paper. Nicholas' point about
"thv" and "thf" was well taken, and even if one finds a "thv"
in a position where one might otherwise expect "thf", then statistics
an help the interpretation."”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>>  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> You mean word count – I thought you weren’t in
for that ;-)<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>That is a jab, Dan, ignoring the facts of what I said."
<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=black face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>But it’s what you frequently do. You give
examples and stress how important the one deviation is when suits your theory,
and stress how important the statistical evidence in another case is. You very
selective with these things. Both <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>thf</span></i></b> and <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>thv</span></i></b> occur for the same sounds, be they voiced
or not. That is the fact that remains without native speakers to tell us where
the cluster was voiced and where it wasn’t.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Dan <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</body>

</html>