<html xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">

<head>
<meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 11 (filtered medium)">
<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:Wingdings;
        panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Gentium;
        panose-1:2 0 5 3 6 0 0 2 0 4;}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:Gentium;}
span.E-MailFormatvorlage18
        {mso-style-type:personal-compose;
        color:navy;}
@page Section1
        {size:595.3pt 841.9pt;
        margin:70.85pt 68.3pt 2.0cm 68.3pt;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body lang=DE link=blue vlink=purple>

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Michael Everson<br>
Sent: Saturday, November 20, 2010 11:57 AM</span></font><span lang=EN-GB><br>
<br>
</span><span lang=EN-GB><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“On 20 Nov 2010, at 07:53, A. J. Trim wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> I thought that you were recommending <dew>
"two" for both masculine and feminine. Has that changed?<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> I don't regard the difference as significant but
some people believe that there is a real difference between <iw> and
<yw>. Perhaps we should recommend that they write their supposed
difference as <yu> and <yw> instead.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>The difference is marked between <dew> m. and
<dyw> f.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>So this has <<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>yw</span></i></b>> for <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>lyw</span></i></b>-words and <<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ew</span></i></b>> for <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>tew</span></i></b>-words. So, in KS <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>bew</span></i></b>-words are spelt
with <<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ÿw</span></i></b>>
or <<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ëw</span></i></b>>,
is that correct?<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“There is no evidence in the texts that <iw> and
<yw> differ, because there is no <iw> in the texts.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Precisely. There is evidence, however, that
<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>lyw</span></i></b>-words
and <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>bew</span></i></b>-words
remained separate throughout the history of traditional Cornish. </span></font><span
lang=EN-GB> <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“Pol Hodge gave us notes when he read the proof of the
SWF/K version of the second edition of Skeul an Tavas. Here is how the exchange
went:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>>> iw [iʊ] a sequence of ee in English see and
oo in took in rapid succession: liw [liʊ] ‘colour’, piw [piʊ] ‘who’. There is
no difference in pro nunciation between iw and uw and yw; you have to learn
which words use which spelling. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> Not true but you are right in reality.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>>> yw [iʊ] a sequence of ee in English see and
oo in took in rapid succession: byw [biʊ] ‘alive’, pyw [piʊ] ‘to own’. There is
no difference in pronunciation between iw and uw and yw; you have to learn
which words use which spelling. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> There is! But in reality most speakers don't
bother.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>When I see Pol in a week, I will certainly speak to
him about this. "Not true but you are right in reality"? "There
is a difference but in reality”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>You left the sentence dangling when it was about
to get interesting … </span></font><font color=navy face=Wingdings><span
lang=EN-GB style='font-family:Wingdings;color:navy'>L</span></font><font
color=navy><span lang=EN-GB style='color:navy'><o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>The diphthong spellt <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>u</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ew</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>yw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>iw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>uw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>aw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ow</span></i></b> are notoriously
muddled up in RC and show marked interference from L1 English. Pol’s statement
from the view of recommended pronunciations for the SWF as well as KK are
incorrect, though. Both KK recommends the four-way distinction of <<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>iw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>yw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ew</span></i></b>, <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>uw</span></i></b>> as [iʊ ɪʊ ɛʊ yʊ]
and SWF follows this recommendation for earlier Middle Cornish. For Tudor and
Late Cornish it recommends [ɪʊ ɛʊ ɛʊ ɪʊ], i.e. a two-way distinction. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“That means that there isn't a difference between
<iw> and <yw> except in the mind (and not on the tongue) of Ken
George, and Pol and the rest of them have been sold a pup.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>If speakers of Revived Cornish don’t follow
the recommendations, the one making the recommendations can hardly be blamed. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>There are many languages that
orthographically show distinctions no longer made in speech, look at English
<meet> ~ <meat>. This doesn’t mean they’re wrong…</span></font><span
lang=EN-GB> <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“Plus since there is no evidence in the texts for the
distinction, it *is* true to say that "There is no difference in
pronunciation between iw and uw and yw; you have to learn which words use which
spelling."<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Lyw-words were always distinct from
bew-words.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“At least Pol is rational enough to see what the
reality is. The problem is that he *wants* to follow a theory which doesn't fit
the facts of the language. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>Ken George was wrong here, since there is no evidence
in the texts AT ALL for this distinction. The AHG was wrong to build in this
"aspiration" into the SWF, because even if it were realizable (which
it has not been for more than two decades) it still isn't Cornish.”<font
color=navy><span style='color:navy'><o:p></o:p></span></font></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Ken George was wrong to propose this four-way
diphthong distinction for ca. 1500, he wasn’t wrong about an OC distinction of
three front w-diphthongs (which he spells <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>iw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>yw</span></i></b>, <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>ew</span></i></b> in KK), but again it wasn’t /iw/ (<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>liw</span></i></b>) and /ɪw/ (<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>byw</span></i></b> ~ <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>bew</span></i></b>) that merged, it
was /ɪw/ (<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>byw</span></i></b>
~ <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>bew</span></i></b>) and
/ew/ (<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>tew</span></i></b>).<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Dan <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'> <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</body>

</html>