<html xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:st1="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">

<head>
<meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 11 (filtered medium)">
<o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags"
 name="place"/>
<!--[if !mso]>
<style>
st1\:*{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) }
</style>
<![endif]-->
<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:Gentium;
        panose-1:2 0 5 3 6 0 0 2 0 4;}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:Gentium;}
@page Section1
        {size:595.3pt 841.9pt;
        margin:70.85pt 68.3pt 2.0cm 68.3pt;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body lang=DE link=blue vlink=purple>

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Michael Everson<br>
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2010 3:25 PM</span></font><span lang=EN-GB><br>
<br>
<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“On 22 Nov 2010, at 14:09, Daniel Prohaska wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>>> “The objection to iw < iu is that it
always represents the same sound as yw and is without warrant in the
traditional language.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>>  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> What does <yw> mean here [iʊ] or [ɪʊ]?
Both?<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>In the revived language, [iʊ]~[ɪʊ] are allophones of
/iʊ/, written in KS yw, uw, and -u.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=black face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>That was not my question. I wanted to know
what sound(s) Nicholas believes was/were represented by <<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>yw</span></i></b>>.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“> How do you explain<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> Lhuyd <liụ> : <bêụ><o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>Explain how? One might write these lyw and bÿw~bëw, if
that is what you are asking.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=black face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>I was not inquiring about your
orthographical solution in KS. I meant, how to explain the phonological history
of the words attested in OC as <<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>biu</span></i></b>> and <<b><i><span style='font-weight:
bold;font-style:italic'>liu</span></i></b>> and why they have a different
outcome in LC, different orthographic profiles in MC, different phonemes in
Breton, Welsh and Irish and are according to Jackson of a different origin in Proto-Celtic
and British.  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> <diweth> (TH 18a)<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“This is di-weth/di.wəθ/ not diw-eth /diʊ.əθ/; it is
not a diphthong.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=black face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>It is treated exactly like a diphthong in
traditional Cornish and by Lhuyd. It is impossible for you to ascertain whether
traditionally it was pronounced /di.wəθ/ and not /diʊ.əθ/. It’s an old
formation, possibly as old as Proto-Celtic as we have OIr. <i><span
style='font-style:italic'>díad</span></i>, OW <i><span style='font-style:italic'>diued</span></i>,
<st1:place w:st="on">OB</st1:place> <i><span style='font-style:italic'>diued</span></i>.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Nicholas said <iw> doesn’t occur at
all in traditional Cornish. It does. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Dan<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</body>

</html>