<html xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">

<head>
<meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 11 (filtered medium)">
<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:Gentium;
        panose-1:2 0 5 3 6 0 0 2 0 4;}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:Gentium;}
@page Section1
        {size:595.3pt 841.9pt;
        margin:70.85pt 68.3pt 2.0cm 68.3pt;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body lang=DE link=blue vlink=purple>

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Thanks, again, Owen. This is not about me
wanting to be right, but I had hoped that it would be ok to entertain the
possibility of voiced consonants in this position. No, the theory is not yet
fleshed out, but maybe this will happen in time to come.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>I also thank you for seconding Eddie
reminder concerning decorum.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Dan<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Owen Cook<br>
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2010 4:40 AM</span></font><span lang=EN-GB><br>
<br>
</span><span lang=EN-GB><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>"On 21 November 2010 13:45, Michael Everson
<everson@evertype.com> wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> If Dan makes similar claims and does not back
them up (as Nicholas does) with reference to<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> the texts, then Dan is doing the same sort of
thing as Bailey.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>For reasons that have already been discussed, the only
"texts" that we can absolutely count on to be relevant is JCH. Dan's
given his arguments based upon that text. The evidence is scanty, one way or
the other, but the L1 interference argument doesn't really account for the variation
we see there.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>If you really require a grand theory, how about this:
General weakness of non-prevocalic non-sibilant fricatives left them vulnerable
to devoicing, particularly when final before other voiceless consonants, as well
as to elision and alteration in the place of articulation. Hence [x] > [h]
> 0 and even occasional [x] > [θ]; hence [θ] > [h]; hence final [v]
> [f] or 0, and final [ð] > [θ] or 0. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>Brugmann notwithstanding, free variation does occur,
as does sociolinguistically conditioned variation. In the Leonard Cohen song "Hallelujah",
the word 'hallelujah' is rhymed with 'do you', 'overthrew you', 'outdrew you'
and 'knew you'. Rufus Wainwright pronounces 'you' in these words as [juː]
rather than [jə]. So who's<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>wrong, Rufus or Leonard?<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>I'd also like to echo Eddie's concern for decorum.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>~~Owen"<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</body>

</html>