<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">But these are different in origin and in Hiberno-English <i>meat</i> is still often [me:t].</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The objection to <i>iw < iu</i> is that it always represents the same sound as <i>yw</i> and is without warrant in the traditional language.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i> is sometimes used finally in words like <i>iudi</i> 'Judaea', <i>victuri</i> 'victory' and even in <i>chi</i> 'house' and <i>whi</i> 'ye, you'. <iw>is wholly unattested.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">If one respects the scribes one does not introduce alien graphs where they are not necessary.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><iw> was first by George in imitation of Breton and Welsh, because he mistakenly believed that Cornish /iw/ and /Iw/ were separate diphthongs. The SWF and all other speakers (including George himself) pronounce the two identically.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">What possible reason can there be for using both, when <i>yw</i> is both sufficient and traditional?</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 2010 Du 22, at 03:57, Owen Cook wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>English <meet> ~ <meat>. This doesn’t mean they’re<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">wrong…</blockquote></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>