<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">How then do you explain the examples from Mount's Bay with th? The informants had heard their forms from native speakers. Native speakers trump phonetic representations by non-natives, I believe.<div><br><div><div>On 2010 Du 22, at 09:18, Hewitt, Stephen wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Charis SIL"><span style="font-family: 'Charis SIL'; ">It looks as if Breton and, quite possibly, Cornish gave a different treatment to the word for “fifteen” from Welsh.</span></font><font face="Charis SIL"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-family: 'Charis SIL'; "><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>Lhuyd’s<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><i><span style="font-style: italic; ">pemdhak</span></i><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>may well have been correct.</span></font></span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>