<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Actually, Stephen, the three diphthongs in Breton seem to corroborate my thesis.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">North Welsh has three diphthongs, but <yw> does not contain a high front vowel but a centralised one.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This is because the series /iw Iw ew/ was too crowded, so the middle diphthong has moved its nucleus backwards in the mouth.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In Breton the distinction to which you refer does not seem to be in the nucleus but in the coda.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Because the members of the series would otherwise be too close together, in those dialects that distinguish three diphthongs</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">one finds iw/ew/eo. I cannot see from the three maps for which you provided links that</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">there is anywhere a series iw/Iw/ew. The distinguishing feature of ew~w is in the second part of the diphthong, not</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">the first. Have I understood this correctly?</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">If I have then my thesis stands. George's series /iw Iw ew/ is without parallel in Brythonic.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font><br><div><br><div><div>On 2010 Du 24, at 13:45, Hewitt, Stephen wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div style="margin-top: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm; margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; margin-left: 0cm; font-size: 12pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font size="2" face="Charis SIL"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Charis SIL'; ">Not true; that is Standard Breton, which is a fabrication with little authentic basis in the spoken language.<o:p></o:p></span></font></div><div style="margin-top: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm; margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; margin-left: 0cm; font-size: 12pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font size="2" face="Charis SIL"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Charis SIL'; ">Even though this is not indicated in the main standard grammars, many dialects of Breton do in fact have a three-way opposition (the second term <i><span style="font-style: italic; ">w</span></i><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>found in a relatively small number of words).</span></font></div></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>