<html xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">

<head>
<meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 11 (filtered medium)">
<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:Gentium;
        panose-1:2 0 5 3 6 0 0 2 0 4;}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:Gentium;}
@page Section1
        {size:595.3pt 841.9pt;
        margin:70.85pt 68.3pt 2.0cm 68.3pt;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body lang=DE link=blue vlink=purple>

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Michael Everson<br>
Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 10:38 PM</span></font><span lang=EN-GB><br>
<br>
</span><span lang=EN-GB><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>"On 23 Nov 2010, at 20:19, Daniel Prohaska wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>> TH 18a <diweth> <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>This is not a diphthong. This is disyllabic
"di-weth"~"dy-weth"~"de-weth" in the same way
that "dy-worth"~"de-worth"~"da-worth and
"dy-war"~"de-war" are disyllabic.” <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>This is a false analogy because <b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>diwedh</span></i></b> is stressed on
the first syllable whereas <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>dhyworth</span></i></b>
is stressed on the second. I doubt that /w/ had phonemic status in
Proto-Celtic, or even in British. It’s phonemic status is still difficult to
ascertain for Welsh as it is rather a positional variant of /ʊ/.  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“On etymological grounds as well it is di- + wed-.
Moreover Breton is "di-vez" and Welsh is "di-wedd".” <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Etymological grounds? Whose etymology? …
just kidding…<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Yes, I’m aware of the etymology. My Breton
dictionary transcribes <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>diwezh</span></i></b>
with [iw] just like it transcribes the diphthong <b><i><span style='font-weight:
bold;font-style:italic'>div</span></i></b> ‘two’. As I said above, the phonemic
status of /w/ in Welsh is difficult to ascertain and one may question whether
it’s not just a positional variant of /ʊ/. Also, on etymological grounds, this
is a very old formation, cf. Old Irish <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;
font-style:italic'>díad</span></i></b>.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“Lhuyd's "diụath" is "di-ụath",
and as you know he does explicitly state that ụ may be either vocalic or
consonantal.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>So, you are saying either is possible.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'> “I don't believe that you have grounds to read this
as "diw-eth", Dan.” <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>I believe I do.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“Or that George is right to write it [ˈdiƱęð] (which
must mean [ˈdiʊɛð]).”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=black face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>It must, though I would transcribe [ˈdɪʊəθ]
(in pausa).  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“The texts also have the verb "dywethe",
"dowethe", with Lhuyd's "diụadha". Clearly these are
"dy-wethe", "do-wethe", "di-ụadha";” <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Yes, they are. Such allophonic alternations
of vocalic versus consonantal [w] ~ [ʊ] are typical of the British languages
when stress travels along with an added syllable in derivation. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“compare "tha worth" for
"dyworth".”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>I cannot consider this an analogical case
as there is not form of <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>dyworth</span></i></b>
that has initial stress like <b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:
italic'>diwedh</span></i></b>.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'> “Even the form "duatha" can be analyzed
"du-[w]atha" where the initial "di" has become
"də".<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>I hope you won't claim that /diʊ/ becomes /doʊ/ or
that "duatha" indicates du- [diʊ] + atha, because you're still stuck
with "dowethe" and "tha worth" which could not be explained
by the same claim.”<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Well, that N.Boson’s <duath> is the
equivalent of Lhuyd’s <<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>diụaδ</span></i></b>>
shows that <u> is a valid spelling for [ɪʊ]. With loss of stress the
vowel in the prefix can easily be further centralised to [ə] which would give [dəˈwɛðə]
spelt <dowethe>, though the pronunciation <<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>diụaδa</span></i></b>> was also
recorded by Lhuyd. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>So, no I’m not claiming /iw/ became [oʊ],
but in stress shift from initial [ˈdɪʊəθ] to penultimate [dɪˈwɛðə] vocalic [ʊ]
is replaced by consonantal [w]. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Lhuyd spells the w-diphthongs with <<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ụ</span></i></b>> where it means
[ʊ], just as he spells syllable initial /w/ as <<b><i><span
style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>ụ</span></i></b>>.  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'> <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt'>“I agree with Nicholas: there is no example of a
diphthong "iw" in Traditional Cornish.”<font color=navy><span
style='color:navy'><o:p></o:p></span></font></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'> Of course you do. You must explain away
the attestation of <<b><i><span style='font-weight:bold;font-style:italic'>iw</span></i></b>>
I ponted out because it threatens your dogma that <iw> is unattested and
unwarranted in Cornish. But, it occurs and is explicable. Your defaulting to
words with a different stress pattern as attested <diweth> is not a
correct analogy and I shall consider it special pleading. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'>Dan  <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoPlainText><font size=3 color=navy face=Gentium><span lang=EN-GB
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:navy'><o:p> </o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</body>

</html>