<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Given that Tregear writes <i>lyf</i>/<i>lyw</i> 'flood' as <i>lew</i>, I think your suggestion unlikely.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">It is more proable that <i>lew</i> 'colour' and <i>lyw</i> are variants spellings, but are similar in pronunciation.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">After all Tregear always writes <i>ew</i> 'is' whereas other texts have <i>yw</i>/<i>yv</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Whe 11, at 14:06, Dr Jon Mills wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; "><div>I took it, therefore, that "lew" in Jordan (1611) was indicative of a sound change between Middle and Late Cornish.</div></span></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>