<font color='black' size='2' face='Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif'>
<div><FONT face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"></FONT>Approaches to teaching Cornish have, so far, tended to prescribe a particular version of Cornish for pedagogical purposes. Such models I call 'didactolects'. Indeed teachers seem to think that a didactolect is a prerequisite for teaching and learning Cornish, and they select dictionaries and course books, etc. for their students according to their own preferred didactolect. </div>


<div><br>
However a prescriptive approach of this kind is not necessarily in the best interest of the learner. A learner today, who wishes to be able to read and write revived Cornish and converse with other members of the Cornish language community will inevitably encounter variation in language use. This variation will include lexical variation, syntactic variation and, of course, orthographic variation. </div>


<div><br>
With regard to the latter, it has been noted for some time now that a "single written form" is needed. However a single written form can only come about when the community as whole adopts a given form by consensus. Thus a single written form cannot be prescribed by any individual, or by any institution, official or otherwise. It is unlikely that consensus on orthography will occur in the foreseeable future.<br>
Ol an gwella,</div>


<div>Jon<br>
</div>


<div style="CLEAR: both">_____________________________________ <br>
Dr. Jon Mills, <br>
University of Kent</div>
<br>
<br>


<div style="FONT-FAMILY: arial,helvetica; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Dr Jon Mills <j.mills@email.com><br>
To: spellyans@kernowek.net<br>
Sent: Thu, Feb 24, 2011 9:21 am<br>
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] loan words<br>
<br>


<div id=AOLMsgPart_3_6959d037-527e-4fc1-89b1-c4f6e6644c84><FONT color=black size=2 face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">

<div>Ceri,</div>


<div>I don't think anybody in this discussion is recommending that ceratin lexical items be proscribed. Within the Cornish language community as a whole, there will inevitably be variation in lexical choice.<br>
Ol an gwella,</div>


<div>Jon<br>
</div>


<div style="CLEAR: both">_____________________________________ <br>
Dr. Jon Mills, <br>
University of Kent</div>
<br>
<br>


<div style="FONT-FAMILY: arial,helvetica; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Ceri Young <<A href="mailto:rcr_young@yahoo.co.uk">rcr_young@yahoo.co.uk</A>><br>
To: Standard Cornish discussion list <<A href="mailto:spellyans@kernowek.net">spellyans@kernowek.net</A>><br>
Sent: Wed, Feb 23, 2011 11:13 pm<br>
Subject: Re: [Spellyans] loan words<br>
<br>


<div id=AOLMsgPart_3_ef920853-7404-4a3c-a2ec-22e327cebc51>
<STYLE type=text/css>#AOLMsgPart_3_6959d037-527e-4fc1-89b1-c4f6e6644c84 td{color: black;} #AOLMsgPart_3_6959d037-527e-4fc1-89b1-c4f6e6644c84 #AOLMsgPart_3_ef920853-7404-4a3c-a2ec-22e327cebc51 td{color: black;}  #AOLMsgPart_3_6959d037-527e-4fc1-89b1-c4f6e6644c84 #AOLMsgPart_3_ef920853-7404-4a3c-a2ec-22e327cebc51 DIV {margin:0px;} </STYLE>


<div style="FONT-FAMILY: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">

<div>Michael, why would you insist such a loan word would need to be 'native Brythonic' anyway? Welsh, Breton & Cornish emerged from a Romano-Brittonic language, didn't they? Their common base is not purely Celtic, so why the hostility to a loan word that Welsh anciently borrowed from Latin, but which on this occasion, Cornish apparently didn't, if it patches a hole in the language? It's a product of the same ancient forge and raw materials. Unless it breaks general rules by which SW Brittonic would have assimilated a Latin loan word, in the way of its appearence etc. I'd love to know what your objections are.</div>


<div> </div>


<div>I learn from this forum that it's horribly 'prejudicial' for Cornish speakers to wish to avoid what they might deem unnecessarily borrowed Anglicisms, but not at all 'prejudicial' to propose to purge Revived Cornish of its more recently borrowed words from Cornish's Romano-Brittonic sibling languages. How would Spellyans seek to police such assertions? And when will Spellyans choose to deem the revived language as sufficiently alive that Cornish speakers are able to shape their own language via their own usage, independently of the constraints imposed by the attested lexicon?</div>


<div> </div>


<div>Best wishes,</div>


<div>Ceri.<br>
</div>


<div style="FONT-FAMILY: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">

<div style="FONT-FAMILY: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 13px"><FONT size=2 face=Tahoma>
<HR SIZE=1>
</FONT></FONT></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</font>