<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Exactly. I tend to  prefer the attested word, even if it is an obvious borrowing from Middle English or Modern English, to the unattested word borrowed from Welsh or Breton.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">If there is a choice between two attested words, one native and one borrowed from English, I will use both. </span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">One has to choose judiciously. Too many English borrowings and one's prose appears overloaded. Too few borrowings and it becomes unintelligible.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This is quite a different matter from the use unattested words borrowed from Welsh and Breton when an attested Anglicism is available. </span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Or the use of a word from Old Cornish or preserved only in toponyms, when there is a well-attested English word in the texts.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This is where the disagreements occur. I prefer <i>fss</i> to <i>enep</i>, <i>ryver</i> to <i>awan</i>, <i>chair</i> to <i>cador</i>, <i>rom</i> to <i>stevel</i>.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Then there is the question of unattested inflected forms. <i>Tra</i> has the suppletive plural <i>taclow</i>, <i>taclenow</i>. <i>Traow</i> is unattested except for two examples in Lhuyd. <i>Chy</i> has the suppletive plural <i>treven</i>; *<i>chiow</i> is unattested and is not, I believe, to be recommended.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">We also have to consider inauthentic idiom. <i>In kever</i> with nouns to mean 'about', for example, or the use of <i>a vry</i> to mean 'of note, of worth'.  <i>Nefra</i> is often used to mean 'never' in the past, when <i>bythqweth</i>, <i>byscath</i> is the authentic usage. Or the use of <i>dywscovarn</i>, <i>dewdros</i> and <i>dywarrow</i> when the attested forms are <i>scovornow</i>, <i>treys</i> and <i>garrow</i>. Another very common inauthentic idiom is the use of <i>yth o </i>+ verbal adjective to make the past passive, when <i>y feu</i> is the more authentic usage. <i>Yth o va ledhys</i> means 'he had been killed'; <i>y feu va ledhys</i> 'he was killed'.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Since we have no native speakers, I believe that the texts should always be our guide when attempting to write and speak Cornish. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font><div><div>On 2011 Whe 24, at 09:21, Dr Jon Mills wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; ">I don't think anybody in this discussion is recommending that ceratin lexical items be proscribed. Within the Cornish language community as a whole, there will inevitably be variation in lexical choice.<br></span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>