<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Some people are querying the use of <i>Beybel</i> for 'Bible' in Cornish and are pointing out that </span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">both UC and indeed UCR used <i>Bybel</i>. </span></font></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">*<i>Bybel</i> is Nance's coinage and first appears in his 1938 Cornish-English Dictionary.</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">*<i>Bybel</i> (KK <i>Bibel</i>) is borrowed from Modern Breton <i>Bibl</i> and seems to me to be an impossible form in Cornish.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">George in his most recent dictionary suggests that <i>Bibel</i> is from English from French.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Since the vowel is long [i:] the word would have been borrowed before the English Great Vowel Shift,</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">i.e. before the fifteenth century. But before the shift the word would have ended with final schwa,</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">and would have therefore have been borrowed into Cornish as [bi:bl@], written</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><<Byble, Bybla, Bibla>>. This is the form in which the Middle English word was borrowed into Irish: <i>Bíobla</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In the Cornish texts (OCV, PC, RD, <i>Beunans Meriasek</i>, Tregear, <i>Sacrament an Alter</i>, Lhuyd's Preface) the Bible is referred to as <i>an scryptour</i> or <i>an scryptours</i>. There are about 80 examples.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">If the word 'Bible' was borrowed into Cornish from English, and there are no attested examples, it was almost certainly borrowed after the Reformation. It was as a result of the Reformation that the scriptures were translated into the vernacular and thus one-volume portable Bibles became common. Only after the Reformation would a word for 'Bible' have been necessary in Cornish.  </span></font></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">If the word was borrowed into Cornish at or after the Reformation, it would have been taken from English and would have contained a diphthong in the stressed vowel: [b@ibl]. Such a form would naturally have been written <<Beybel>> in Cornish. </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">This is exactly the form in which it appears in Welsh: <i>Beibl</i>. It is for this reason that our Cornish version of the Bible bears the title </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">AN BEYBEL SANS.</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The Cornish for 'Bible' is <i>Beybel</i>. Cornish *<i>Bybla</i>, *<i>Bîbla</i> from Middle English is a possibility (though unattested). UC, UCR <i>Bybel</i>, KK <i>Bibel</i> is, I believe, mistaken.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></font></div><div><br></div><div> </div><div><i> </i></div></body></html>