<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In <i>Cornish Studies 15</i> (2007) 11-26 I published an article on the Cornish englyn.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The best known example in Cornish of this metrical form is recorded three times</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">and begins <i>An lavar coth yw lavar gwyr.</i></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In my article I suggested that the original form of the englyn was probably:</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>An lavar coth yw lavar gwyr:</i></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>byth dorn re ver, byth tavas re hyr;</i></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>mes collas den heb davas y dyr.</i></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Here there is alliteration in <i>den,</i> <i>davas</i> and <i>dyr</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">There is also internal rhyme between <i>collas</i> and <i>davas</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">It is even possible, though I did not suggest this in my article, that</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">the original form of the englyn may have been:</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>An lavar coth yw lavar gwyr:</i></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>byth dorn re ver, byth tavas re hyr:</i></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>mes collas den heb davas dyr</i></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">'The old saying is a true saying:</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">a hand is wont to be too short, a tongue is wont to be too long;</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">but  the man without a tongue lost ground.'</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Here the verb <i>collas</i> rhymes with <i>davas</i> and <i>davas</i> and <i>dyr</i> alliterate.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>Dyr </i>is lenited because it is the object of an inflected verb <i>collas</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This syntax has not been attested in Cornish but is normal in Welsh.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">The whole englyn, in whatever form, is archaic in the following ways.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">1. It is in englyn metre, an inherited verse form, which is rare in Cornish.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">2. The verbs <i>byth</i>, <i>byth</i> and <i>collas</i> are used without particle. This seems to be a feature of gnomic verse.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">3. There is alliteration and internal rhyme (common Brythonic features)</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">4. The word for 'short' is <i>ber</i>, rather than the more usual <i>cot</i>. Elsewhere in Cornish <i>ber</i> is used only in fixed expressions like <i>a ver spys</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Yet <i>davas</i>, with assibilated final, </span></font></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">rather than Old Cornish <i>tauot</i>, </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">shows that the englyn was composed in Middle Cornish, .</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I think it very likely that this englyn dates from the earlier part of the Middle Cornish period.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I would put it in the early thirteenth century.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Notice that the word <i>tavas</i> has unstressed -<i>a</i>- in the englyn, which rhymes with <i>collas</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">In the earliest Middle Cornish 'tongue' was <i>tavas</i>, not <i>taves</i>.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas </span></font></font></div></body></html>