<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I suspect that <i>gwef</i> is a back formation on the basis of the comparative. In *<i>gwywha</i>, *<i>gwewha</i> the -h- of the suffix devoiced the w, which</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">between vowels was pronounced as a bilabial [f]. From this the simplex <i>gwef</i> was extracted.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></font></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gor 15, at 13:49, Jon Mills wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; ">If we consider the presence of final <-f> and <ff>, should the the final phoneme not be a fricative, /v/ ?<br></span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>